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Panasonic G1 + Schneider-Kreuznach Xenon 1:2/50
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:27 pm    Post subject: Panasonic G1 + Schneider-Kreuznach Xenon 1:2/50 Reply with quote

The Xenon is a nice lens, it looks like a short tele and also behaves as such on the G1. Interesting feature is that the Xenon has an extra diaphragm blade on top of the normal diaphragm for fading to black.

I didn't expect it but the Xenon appears to have a swirly bokeh. I like its output; what about you?

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peter, i really like the output of that lens very much! i just finished my collection of S-K kodak retina reflex lenses and i love them also on my ep1. the colors and sharpness when i hit the focus are incredible! in fact, i just ordered an adapter so i can use them on my 5d--cant wait to get it!
thanks for sharing.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like first shoots best, other ones less good to me.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

very helios-like, but more precise, i think ...


PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always liked Xenons and actually I have a few sitting here (2/40mm with multiblade iris) waiting to be
converted for G1/GH1. Your shots nicely prove why I like them .... excellent work as ever!


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I'm not going to talk about the lens - what a terrific lighting in #2
Is it natural light only, or did you use a panel to open up shadows? Or raised shadow compensation in raw software?

If I had a room with that killer lighting and colours, I would spend the day there shooting portraits. Shocked


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great shots!

Orio, you just need to find an open place with the window that faces south Wink You won't get the direct sun and the sky is your softbox. My place faces the south-east and gets some morning sun, but in the afternoon, it's nice for photos.


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 5:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you very much guys!

Orio wrote:
Sorry, I'm not going to talk about the lens - what a terrific lighting in #2
Is it natural light only, or did you use a panel to open up shadows? Or raised shadow compensation in raw software?


There was no shadow compensation applied. You just need to have a light room and the kids are sitting in front of a white table, and light is coming from a large window. I believe Italian windows are usually not that big?


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great sample shots again. I like the bit of swirl in the bokeh ... not to much, not to less ...

Cheers
Tobias


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wilson.c wrote:

Orio, you just need to find an open place with the window that faces south Wink You won't get the direct sun and the sky is your softbox.


Uh... my studio is currently in what used to be my father's atelier, which has two windows facing north. I always read on art books that in order to have non-changing lighting during the day the windows of an atelier must face north.


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spotmatic wrote:

There was no shadow compensation applied. You just need to have a light room and the kids are sitting in front of a white table.


Thanks Spot. By looking at the image, I was sure that there must have been some kind of diffusion on the shadow. The white table explains it.

Spotmatic wrote:
I believe Italian windows are usually not that big?


In traditional houses, yes, you're correct, windows are not very large. I guess this is because sunlight in the spring-summer can be very bright if you have large windows, and in the winter, large windows mean less heat insulation.
In the more recent houses, however, the trend is to make larger windows than traditional ones.
In my home, I have replaced the terrace window, which was made of three window-doors in sequence, with one full glass window and door. It faces northeast so I have a constant lighting for most of the day. But if I put photographic stuff in my living room Monica will kill me! Laughing


PostPosted: Tue Apr 13, 2010 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First two shots are awesome, Peter! Agree about the lighting in #2, excellent
portrait!


PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Peter,

The lighting in #2 is great, by the way are those your slippers Wink