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Omd em10mk2 or fuji X-E1 for low light handheld ?
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:25 pm    Post subject: Omd em10mk2 or fuji X-E1 for low light handheld ? Reply with quote

I need small and light .
I generally shoot static subjects , in low light
Not convinced what to choose . Will the Fuji f2 wide primes UNSTABILISED(18mm ,23mm ) do better than the fast stabilised 15/1,7 or 17/1,8 or the 14-42/3,5-5,6 from mft? Is the aps-C fuji sensor so much better to compensate the shake by bumping up the iso ?
Unfortunately , the 18-55/2,8-4 stabilised from Fuji is too big for what I search ,I am used to small lenses , coming from the sony 16-50 OSS and the zuiko 14-42


PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

C'mon , really NO one ? Done a lot of research these weeks , still no conclusion ....


PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What I understood is that the low-light auto-focus performance of the 1st generation X-trans is not that great, but I cannot tell from personal experience.

With my X-T1 (with 2nd gen sensor + processor), I do a lot of after-sunset pics with the Funinon 18 2.0 and 23 1.4. I am happier with the results than with the pics I made with the (well stabilized) 18-135 f/3.5-5.6 kit zoom. So for me, wide aperture wins over OIS.

If you intend to use adapted lenses in very low light, the EVF can get grainy and a bit slow, especially since the X-E1 EVF is of an older design (and smaller) than the X-T1's. But again, fast glass can help here Smile


PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sjak wrote:
What I understood is that the low-light auto-focus performance of the 1st generation X-trans is not that great, but I cannot tell from personal experience.

With my X-T1 (with 2nd gen sensor + processor), I do a lot of after-sunset pics with the Funinon 18 2.0 and 23 1.4. I am happier with the results than with the pics I made with the (well stabilized) 18-135 f/3.5-5.6 kit zoom. So for me, wide aperture wins over OIS.

If you intend to use adapted lenses in very low light, the EVF can get grainy and a bit slow, especially since the X-E1 EVF is of an older design (and smaller) than the X-T1's. But again, fast glass can help here Smile


Thanks a lot , your feedback helps a lot ! I am more attracted now by the XE2 or 2s ,wich I understand are close to the T series in terms of sensor , processor , EVF and focus .

The much praised 18-55 seems to me (apart the only 18mm ) to be a tad too big , adding bulk and weight to the camera just enough to make me leave it at home frequently enough and prefere a smaller and more discrete combo .


PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 18 2.0 is very compact, especially without hood; the 23 1.4 is not compact. These are the only AF-lenses I use on a regular basis, the 23 1.4 only for family&friends events.

The 3 new Fuji 2.0 lenses are quite compact (the 23-35-50mm). Smallest of all is the 27 2.8, which is extremely compact, plenty sharp, but does not have an aperture ring.

The X-E2&2S have indeed the same sensor etc as the X-T1, only the EVF is different, but to my understanding, improved compared to the X-E1. The rendering of the 1st gen X-trans is different to the 2nd gen, this may or may not bother you.

Owners of the Olympus seem to highly regard its stabilization.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sjak wrote:
The 18 2.0 is very compact, especially without hood; the 23 1.4 is not compact. These are the only AF-lenses I use on a regular basis, the 23 1.4 only for family&friends events.

The 3 new Fuji 2.0 lenses are quite compact (the 23-35-50mm). Smallest of all is the 27 2.8, which is extremely compact, plenty sharp, but does not have an aperture ring.

The X-E2&2S have indeed the same sensor etc as the X-T1, only the EVF is different, but to my understanding, improved compared to the X-E1. The rendering of the 1st gen X-trans is different to the 2nd gen, this may or may not bother you.

Owners of the Olympus seem to highly regard its stabilization.


Does the xe1-2-2s have some MF assist (focus peaking or so) ?

Indeed it is good (and I have an old system one ) and teoretically good for MF lenses use . Wich can be true for tele. But the 2x crop is bad for the wide side. And the OM-d 10 mk 2 is not cheap , even preused.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The X-trans-II bodies (so X-E2/2s/T1) have 3*/10* magnification, and you can add focus-peaking if you wish (and you can choose high or low peaking outline, in whire, red or blue)
The X-T1 also has a digital split-image, which gives a range-finder-like focus-assist (part of the image is cut into, and when align it is in focus); I am not sure if the X-E2/2s have this feature too.

If I am well informed, the X-trans i (X-E1 and X-pro1) also have 3*/10* magnification, and peaking, but in white only.

Personally I only use magnification, as I can see best how the image will end up (but takes time)
Others prefer one of the other options. The split-image can make for very fast focusing, convenient when on the move.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks !