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NIKKOR-0 AUTO F2 35MM NIPPON KOGAKU
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 4:15 am    Post subject: NIKKOR-0 AUTO F2 35MM NIPPON KOGAKU Reply with quote

NIKKOR-0 AUTO F2 35MM NIPPON KOGAKU. Fuji X-E2s/X-E2. Shots wide open.

Lens.






Light LR adjustments.































PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 4:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely lens, great demonstration of lens quality!


PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice Roger - you use it well
Tom


PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some great shots showing its character.


PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agree, its a very worthwhile lens. Very versatile.

It was a standard-issue journalistic lens, common part of the kit for press photographers in the 1960's-70's.

I am putting together a posting on this also. Running it plain, on a Pentax K30, on NEX-7, and using a Pixco focal reducer.


PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 2:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roger, you've put together a very nice set of images taken with your old 35/2 Nikkor. I have one that looks very similar to yours -- black nose, but mine is an O-C, the "C" stands for multi coating, from what I understand. Mine has also been converted to AI by Nikon, so it is a very versatile lens. It has been in my personal collection for over 25 years and I am very fond of it.

I hope you don't mind, but I'd like to share a few images I've taken with my 35/2 O-C. The camera is a NEX 7, set to ISO 100, and I haven't done anything to these images other than reduce their sizes for posting here. However, I used Photoshop's raw converter and it automatically makes some adjustments to the image -- in terms of brightness and contrast mostly. Most of the time, I find that the converter manages to do things just about right, so I find that often I don't need to do anything else to the images.

Here are a couple of shots of the 35/2 O-C.




Here in Houston, Texas, we're still running the air conditioner, although it has cooled off some. Still, no fall colors like you're showing in your shots. So I chose some of our most unusual foliage.

These plants are called Night Blooming Cereus. What I find strange about them is how new leaves are formed. You'll note that new leaves branch out from corners of older leaves. There are no real branches like you'd expect to find with other sorts of plants. Each plant has a central stalk from which leaves emerge, and then all remaining leaves are offshoots of these first ones. The NBC is very sensitive to temperature. Even a slight freeze will kill these plants. Here in Houston, it might freeze once or twice a year, so when freezing is in the forecast my wife and I will drag these plants, in their big terra cotta pots, into the house.

At f/2:


At f/8:


At f/16:


I don't have any recent photos of blooms, but I have a few up at flickr. The blooms have a heady but delicate fragrance. Here is a shot from there. Taken with a Canon XS DSLR and Canon 18-55 kit lens.
Night Blooming Cereus by Michael McBroom, on Flickr


PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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