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My very first B&W process & scan
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LucisPictor wrote:
You can select the sky....


There's so much I don't know about Photoshop! Confused
How do I select the sky?


PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is not difficult, Peter.

(I hope I use the correct Photoshop terms.)

1) Click on "Select" in the menu bar.
2) Choose the "Color Range..." option.
3) Click right into the sky (or on the colour you want to select).
4) With the "Fuzziness" slide you can choose how much of the colour you select. There is a preview.
5) With "Select - Feather..." you can activate soft edges, so that there won't be sharp borders between the selected and unselected areas. The Radius depends on what you are dealing with. Just test it.
6) Now you selected the sky, but since you do not want to change the sky but the rest, just click on "Select - Inverse". That's it.

Now you can adjust levels or the curves without chaning the sky.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your tips Carsten. I've tried it but I seem to keep making a mess of the sky around trees (bare branches). Maybe this picture isn't suitable, but one thing's for certain, I have an awful lot to learn. I'm usually quite good at software but I've had a lot of difficulty with PS - the Help file is, well, pretty unhelpful!

I'm using version 7.0, which was given to me where I worked after they upgraded several years ago. I can't afford latest versions. Do you know anywhere I can buy and download a later version cheaply, hopefully with a better Help file? Or do you know of any good tutorials on the web?


PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peterqd wrote:
Thanks for your tips Carsten. I've tried it but I seem to keep making a mess of the sky around trees (bare branches). Maybe this picture isn't suitable, but one thing's for certain, I have an awful lot to learn. I'm usually quite good at software but I've had a lot of difficulty with PS - the Help file is, well, pretty unhelpful!

I'm using version 7.0, which was given to me where I worked after they upgraded several years ago. I can't afford latest versions. Do you know anywhere I can buy and download a later version cheaply, hopefully with a better Help file? Or do you know of any good tutorials on the web?


I'm not sure about Adobe's licence policies but sometimes you find later versions sold on ebay.
There are also education versions (at least in Germany), every student or teacher is entitled to buy one of those. As a teacher I bought such a version, otherwise I would not use PS, it is definitely way too expensive for the "normal" hobby photographer.

The tutorial sites I know are all in German, I'm afraid.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LucisPictor wrote:
The tutorial sites I know are all in German, I'm afraid.


Oh yes, silly me! Your English is so good I completely forgot! Very Happy


PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Erez! I didn't see your message until today, it's really kind of you Smile

I didn't intentionally try to make the pictures look dated, but it's a small country town over 1,000 years old originally, so I guess the age kind of oozes out of the walls. The oldest building in the pictures is probably the church but the black and white building in front of it is, as Carsten said, of Tudor times - about 400-500 years old. The George & Dragon pub is Georgian, probably around 250 years, and the market house with the clock and shelters is probably a little later, around 1800 or possibly earlier.

You've given me the inspiration I've been looking for! I think I'm going to concentrate my future pics on the landscapes and old buildings around where I live. We have an outdoor museum near here where very old local buildings have been reconstructed and preserved. One of them is an Iron Age house, about 2,500 years old!! More to follow.....


PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peterqd wrote:
... We have an outdoor museum near here where very old local buildings have been reconstructed and preserved. One of them is an Iron Age house, about 2,500 years old!! More to follow.....


Wow! I would really like to see that, Peter!


PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LucisPictor wrote:
peterqd wrote:
... We have an outdoor museum near here where very old local buildings have been reconstructed and preserved. One of them is an Iron Age house, about 2,500 years old!! More to follow.....


Wow! I would really like to see that, Peter!


Here's the link Carsten
http://www.coam.org.uk/Buildings/Buildings4.htm#Iron

I'm sure you would like this museum. It's a major attraction for teachers and schoolchildren on "school visits". Have a look at the map and click on the buildings


PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I often wonder why today we have to sacrifice everything in the name of financial efficiency. Everything that we build today (from houses to park benches to cars, even the factories!) is uglier than what we used to build. As a result, our world is getting uglier and uglier. And every time an old thing falls down, we can be sure that they will replace it with something uglier.
Places like the one Peter photographed are going to become more and more lonely islands in the sea of ugliness.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
I often wonder why today we have to sacrifice everything in the name of financial efficiency. Everything that we build today (from houses to park benches to cars, even the factories!) is uglier than what we used to build. As a result, our world is getting uglier and uglier. And every time an old thing falls down, we can be sure that they will replace it with something uglier.
Places like the one Peter photographed are going to become more and more lonely islands in the sea of ugliness.



Around 20 years ago HRH Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, said almost exactly the same, Orio. One of the buildings he most severely criticised was the National Theatre in London, which Simon photographed recently http://forum.mflenses.com/viewtopic.php?t=2203. He also commented on a proposed extension to the National Gallery in London that it looked like a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a much-loved and elegant friend. It caused quite a division in architectural circles at the time as you can imagine.

Thinking about your comments, I found myself writing an essay in reply. I'll just say I think a lot of positive things have happened since the Prince delivered his kick in the pants.


PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the link, Peter. Looks very interesting!

Orio, I'd like to agree.


PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

katzer wrote:

I am moving to a new place soon. It is an old building (built in 1955), and the pylons are a bit old and will need to get a new cement cast around them.


Old building, built in 1955? Here many houses have at least that age, we consider them normal houses. Curious how the perception of things changes from place to place.

Quote:
On our honeymoon, my wife and I traveled across Spain for 3 weeks.
Near the town of Guadalupe we went on a hike. Part of it was on a road paved over a Roman aquaduct, over 2000 years old, still standing strong, stunning.


Those aquaducts are really wonders of architecture, in my opinion, more worth than many most famous buildings. It is incredible how Romans could make those aquaducts running for miles and miles and working exclusively with the force of gravity! This means to plan inequalities of maybe 1-2 millimeter each thousand meters, constantly. How could they do that without electronic instruments, is just amazing. I have read that some of those aquaducts still work today.

Everything in our age and day is instead built with the so called "obsolescence" factor in mind: if a thing does not break, how a factory is supposed to sell you another new model 5-10 years from now? Twisted Evil