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Minolta Rokkor PF 100mm f/2
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2007 10:56 pm    Post subject: Minolta Rokkor PF 100mm f/2 Reply with quote

Any experience with this lens ?


PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nope! Just can tell you that Kadlubek estimates about 200,- for this lens.
(So about 120,- should be a good price...)


PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought for 22 EUR Smile Nobody want it because Minolta MD Smile


PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a great price! But you're right, Minolta MD lenses are really cheap to get at the moment.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you still own that lens (the Minolta MC 2/100mm) ? Did you ever use it, or is it just standing on a shelf ...?

Stephan


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too bad I was late to the inexpensive minolta party.....
I still bought many different versions in the last few years and quite a few of the 58 1.4. I do not have this lens though and am curious to see what it can do.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a great lens, wish I had one.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have one but it lives on the shelf. I have made a few portraits with it on film but none of the open images I took are sharp or really in focus as much as they should have been - probably due to hand/shutter shake and missing focus by an inch. The ones stopped down to F5.6 were very detailed. At F2 the images have great depth and transition of focus, no matter the subject distance. Backgrounds are very creamy as you can imagine, and I think the colour balance is most neutral, even slightly cool, but the contrast is still lower than contemporary Rokkors - not a problem at all.

I would love to see more images from it too on full frame... as I only have m43 cameras digitally it is rather useless adapted, imo, becoming a 200mm F4 for which Minolta has an excellent model. It is rather large so I will buy a 100mm F2.5 to take out instead but I can't see myself ever selling the F2. I will however make sure to use it again when I shoot another roll in my SLR. It's rather similar optically to the earlier 135/2.8's, which I had and sold - that was a very nice lens besides the yellowed glass and rattly construction - heavy for sure, 530g, 105g more than the 100/2.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teemō wrote:
I have one but it lives on the shelf. I have made a few portraits with it on film but none of the open images I took are sharp or really in focus as much as they should have been - probably due to hand/shutter shake and missing focus by an inch. ... At F2 the images have great depth and transition of focus, no matter the subject distance.

Back in 2015 i did compare the classical Minolta portrait lenses (with exception of the 85 VariSoft). You can see their Bokeh and center resolution wider open here:
http://www.artaphot.ch/minolta-sr/objektiv-vergleiche/466-bokeh-mc-1-7-85mm-md-2-85mm-ar-mc-2-100mm-mc-2-5-100mm-md-2-5-100mm
Stephan


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On this website, the author states it is mechanically fragile. Is it your experience?

http://www.personal-view.com/faqs/camera-usage/minolta-rokkor-lenses-faq


PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Antoine wrote:
On this website, the author states it is mechanically fragile. Is it your experience?

http://www.personal-view.com/faqs/camera-usage/minolta-rokkor-lenses-faq


I have had one sample of the Minolta Auto Rokkor 2/100mm and two samples of the MC 2/100mm in my hands.
All three lenses were from Swiss owners, and all three were in perfect, like-new condition. Aperture mechanisms were pristine and focusing was smooth, but not as smooth as with the later MC-X lens series. The focusing ring of the AR/MC 2/100mm is thinner than the focusing ring of eg the MC-X 2.5/100mm, and therefore it may be damaged more easily.

But probably a Russian film-maker has different needs from a Swiss photographer Wink

Stephan


PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
Teemō wrote:
I have one but it lives on the shelf. I have made a few portraits with it on film but none of the open images I took are sharp or really in focus as much as they should have been - probably due to hand/shutter shake and missing focus by an inch. ... At F2 the images have great depth and transition of focus, no matter the subject distance.

Back in 2015 i did compare the classical Minolta portrait lenses (with exception of the 85 VariSoft). You can see their Bokeh and center resolution wider open here:
http://www.artaphot.ch/minolta-sr/objektiv-vergleiche/466-bokeh-mc-1-7-85mm-md-2-85mm-ar-mc-2-100mm-mc-2-5-100mm-md-2-5-100mm
Stephan


I'm surprised by how similarly they all perform. Subtle differences in overall contrast and 'glow'. The MD lenses definitely have better microcontrast but I'm not sure if they are definitely sharper in normal usage. I couldn't hope for an image as sharp on film except perhaps in a studio. I'll be able to try it again on the XD-7 now that I have one - the acute matte screen should make it easier to nail the focus. I just want a MC 100/2.5 for the 55mm threads and for it to be more compact, smoother to focus, less valuable to drop etc. I have the 4/4 MC-X 135mm F2.8 also and found it to be very clinical, and warm, and it has a lot of lateral CA in the light. I think the 100/2 should have less CA as the older Auto Rokkor PF 135/2.8 did. I should make a few shots on film to compare them critically, but that would be better left to those with A7's. The real challenge is finding an effective subject for the comparison.


Antoine wrote:
On this website, the author states it is mechanically fragile. Is it your experience?

http://www.personal-view.com/faqs/camera-usage/minolta-rokkor-lenses-faq


It's 'heavy' to focus. There's a noticeable difference when focusing the lens out towards\against gravity. Mine is in quite worn exterior condition but with perfect glass, but it's actually still lighter to focus than my MC-X 135/2.8, 200/4, which are both in very good condition. The biggest problem is that all of the barrel segments on my lens rattle. None of my other Rokkors have such a poor fitting. It seems that any stiff focusing actually comes from the poor alignment of the focusing barrel on the focusing ring. If I apply any pressure on the top of the focusing ring, or too much at any other point, then it is very stubborn to turn - otherwise it is perfectly smooth. The problem really is the poor fitting causing internal resistance. The focusing barrel actually can rotate freely ever so slightly to either side, and it will be dragged with the focusing ring as a result - the helicoid is too thin and perhaps the grip too short to evenly distribute the force.