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Mike's Seven Laws of Lenses...
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:35 pm    Post subject: Mike's Seven Laws of Lenses... Reply with quote

First Never sell a good lens.

Second When evaluating lenses, look at the pictures, not at the lens.
The Leica Lens Designer's Precept (apocryphal): The only way to test a lens is to use it for a year. Everything else is a shortcut.

Third You can make successful photographs with any lens, no matter how bad.
...And The corollary to the Third Law: You can make terrible photographs with any lens, no matter how good.

Fourth You get no extra credit for using a technically excellent lens.
Ctein's Axiom: If you can't see it, it doesn't count.

Fifth You can never spend too much money on a lens.
Corollary to the Fifth Law: If a lens works for you, it doesn't matter how little you spent for it or how little it might be esteemed by others, it's still the right lens.

Sixth The proper number of lenses to own is the intersection between the sets "all the lenses you need" and "the lowest possible number."
(Another way to say this is "enough but no more.")

Seventh All lenses give their gifts.

((from MIKE JOHNSON's Blog))


PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well said!!! Like 1


And if it's not too presumptuous, may I add to this venerable list a slightly paraphrased version of the oft repeated McKeown's Law:

"The price of an antique camera (or lens) is entirely dependent upon the moods of the buyer and seller at the time of the transaction. "--James McKeown


All the best,

Paul


PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, i can assure you all that 'till now , i've only followed the first and the last rule.....what's next?


PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like 1 Like 1 small


PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Wife's advice-

If you like it, Don't sell it.
If you use it, Don't sell it.
If you do not like it, and you do not use it, then sell it.

I have way too many lenses that I like, using them all is no easy task. Last weekend was sent rebuilding a J-3 mount to house a 1953 KMZ J-3. This weekend- Canon 100/3.5 LTM that needed the element behind the aperture replaced.

Brian


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another rule: If a known good performing lens doesn't perform well on your current digital body, don't sell it to find another because you will likely be upgrading your body in 2-4 years and may regret selling that lens. Hopefully this happens less and less as sensors become better and better.
It's surprising how many of those rules ring true.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:21 am    Post subject: Re: Mike's Seven Laws of Lenses... Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
First Never sell a good lens.

Second When evaluating lenses, look at the pictures, not at the lens.
The Leica Lens Designer's Precept (apocryphal): The only way to test a lens is to use it for a year. Everything else is a shortcut.

Third You can make successful photographs with any lens, no matter how bad.
...And The corollary to the Third Law: You can make terrible photographs with any lens, no matter how good.

Fourth You get no extra credit for using a technically excellent lens.
Ctein's Axiom: If you can't see it, it doesn't count.

Fifth You can never spend too much money on a lens.
Corollary to the Fifth Law: If a lens works for you, it doesn't matter how little you spent for it or how little it might be esteemed by others, it's still the right lens.


Sixth The proper number of lenses to own is the intersection between the sets "all the lenses you need" and "the lowest possible number."
(Another way to say this is "enough but no more.")

Seventh All lenses give their gifts.

((from MIKE JOHNSON's Blog))


Having to live within a budget, (i.e. not having endless money) I have to disagree with the fifth. It's rather easy to spend too much money on a lens! I do however very much agree with the corollary, and agree, yes there may be times when spending a considerable amount on a lens is worthwhile, even if I'm not going to spend over a thousand on any.

The second & seventh are my reasons for not complying with the sixth. More than enough is needed to find out which are the right ones. This will take several lifetimes to home in on. I freely admit I should sell some of those I don't feel suit my styles and a few of the duplicates too.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Always buy zooms because you get more glass for less money. Wink


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is an unwritten rule everybody follows but none would dare say: buy cheap, sell expensive.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would add the following "law":
"No matter how many lenses you have, each picture is taken with just ONE lens."
Corollary: "The more lenses you have, the less you use each one on average."


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald wrote:
I would add the following "law":
"No matter how many lenses you have, each picture is taken with just ONE lens."


Unless you use a lens for a macro reverse shot on the one attached to the body.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like #2, 3 and 4.
You can make good use of any lens.
The difficulties in making pictures are many, and lenses, no matter how good, help with few of them.

Personally, I need time much more than I need lenses. Its easy to order a lens, and get it in your hand at night, to fiddle with, but far more difficult to get a few hours in decent light around interesting subjects.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

May i add that, it isn't easy job finding a very good lens for cheap nowadays.....and if there is one announced,there are many buyers behind it. Of course,the secret would be to buy cheap, and in case one doesn't like it,sell it quickly and trying not to loose money (cannot say the same thing with the AF lenses, most of the times, it's about loosing money,as there are so many deals that are braking any rules of market).


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure rule six should be "One more than is currently in your collection...."


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rule of the day :" next lens is gonna be my last one"


PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

luisalegria wrote:
I like #2, 3 and 4.
You can make good use of any lens.
The difficulties in making pictures are many, and lenses, no matter how good, help with few of them.

Personally, I need time much more than I need lenses. Its easy to order a lens, and get it in your hand at night, to fiddle with, but far more difficult to get a few hours in decent light around interesting subjects.


You speak the truth Luis, I have lenses that have sat in storage for years that I've used once to 'test' in the graveyard behind our house and thought "that's OK, I'll give that a serious workout" - then I forget about it. Rolling Eyes


PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Happened to me more than once: I only buy it and try then sell it. At last kept it due it was more than good.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald wrote:

Corollary: "The more lenses you have, the less you use each one on average."


The story of my life. I have several I have yet to use.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Mike's Seven Laws of Lenses... Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
Corollary to the Fifth Law: If a lens works for you, it doesn't matter how little you spent for it or how little it might be esteemed by others, it's still the right lens.


Similar:

If your subject is transient, the lens on the camera is usually the best one.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the end of 2018 I imposed a moratorium on me buying lenses. Even though each lens teaches me a little more, and all of them are valuable, I had to ask myself whether or not I needed any more to take the pictures I want to take, and the answer was definitely not. That's going to be my litmus test in the future. I may buy more lenses again, but they're going to be lenses I buy with a specific purpose in mind, or lenses that fill specific gaps in my arsenal.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KEO wrote:
At the end of 2018 I imposed a moratorium on me buying lenses. Even though each lens teaches me a little more, and all of them are valuable, I had to ask myself whether or not I needed any more to take the pictures I want to take, and the answer was definitely not. That's going to be my litmus test in the future. I may buy more lenses again, but they're going to be lenses I buy with a specific purpose in mind, or lenses that fill specific gaps in my arsenal.


Would you miss buying a very good lens you always like it for very cheap? Even if you don't particularly need it? That's the question, as i believe very good lenses for less money are3 not to common...so ,who's the one that would skip the oportunity?


PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KEO wrote:
At the end of 2018 I imposed a moratorium on me buying lenses. Even though each lens teaches me a little more, and all of them are valuable, I had to ask myself whether or not I needed any more to take the pictures I want to take, and the answer was definitely not. That's going to be my litmus test in the future. I may buy more lenses again, but they're going to be lenses I buy with a specific purpose in mind, or lenses that fill specific gaps in my arsenal.
I also have a purchase-stop now. The last few lenses were bought with a specific purpose (gathering a small range of soviet K-mount glass)

Now saving money for some trips to put some of the lenses to work Smile

kiddo wrote:
Would you miss buying a very good lens you always like it for very cheap? Even if you don't particularly need it? That's the question, as i believe very good lenses for less money are3 not to common...so ,who's the one that would skip the oportunity?
Spending a little on each perceived opportunity can still cost a lot in the long run.


PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sjak wrote:
KEO wrote:
At the end of 2018 I imposed a moratorium on me buying lenses. Even though each lens teaches me a little more, and all of them are valuable, I had to ask myself whether or not I needed any more to take the pictures I want to take, and the answer was definitely not. That's going to be my litmus test in the future. I may buy more lenses again, but they're going to be lenses I buy with a specific purpose in mind, or lenses that fill specific gaps in my arsenal.
I also have a purchase-stop now. The last few lenses were bought with a specific purpose (gathering a small range of soviet K-mount glass)

Now saving money for some trips to put some of the lenses to work Smile

kiddo wrote:
Would you miss buying a very good lens you always like it for very cheap? Even if you don't particularly need it? That's the question, as i believe very good lenses for less money are3 not to common...so ,who's the one that would skip the oportunity?
Spending a little on each perceived opportunity can still cost a lot in the long run.


Oh, if I found a great deal on a lens I really wanted, I would still buy it of course (I don't mind spending money on good ones that will hold their value or even appreciate). I'm just not out actively seeking more lenses at the moment.

At some point time spent collecting and testing more lenses detracts from time spent using the lenses you already have to create the kind of images you want. I already have around 70 lenses; accumulating more isn't going to help me achieve my goals.

Right now I'm more concerned about figuring out lighting techniques and some other tricks to make the kind of art I have in mind.

That doesn't mean I don't love getting new lenses. I know how enjoyable it can be get a new one and try it out (and maybe take it apart and clean it).


PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KEO wrote:
At some point time spent collecting and testing more lenses detracts from time spent using the lenses you already have to create the kind of images you want. I already have around 70 lenses; accumulating more isn't going to help me achieve my goals.

Right now I'm more concerned about figuring out lighting techniques and some other tricks to make the kind of art I have in mind.

That doesn't mean I don't love getting new lenses. I know how enjoyable it can be get a new one and try it out (and maybe take it apart and clean it).
For me, collecting lenses and camera's is mostly unrelated to my photography. Probably at least 75% of all my pictures from the past 6 month were taken with 1 lens (Jupiter-3) / 1 camera (M Monochrom)


PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sjak wrote:
KEO wrote:
At some point time spent collecting and testing more lenses detracts from time spent using the lenses you already have to create the kind of images you want. I already have around 70 lenses; accumulating more isn't going to help me achieve my goals.

Right now I'm more concerned about figuring out lighting techniques and some other tricks to make the kind of art I have in mind.

That doesn't mean I don't love getting new lenses. I know how enjoyable it can be get a new one and try it out (and maybe take it apart and clean it).


For me, collecting lenses and camera's is mostly unrelated to my photography. Probably at least 75% of all my pictures from the past 6 month were taken with 1 lens (Jupiter-3) / 1 camera (M Monochrom)


I can understand that. I don't consider myself a collector of lenses. I'm a user and learner. I shoot with a different lens every time I go out and compare the results.

I'd love to get a dedicated monochrome digital camera one day. Seems like a great idea for a product.