Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Meyer Kinon f2.5 75mm uncoated projection lens from 1904
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's so beautifull ! render is nice and very interesting ! Thx for sharing


PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice! I'm curious, though -- what sort of projection was being done in 1904? Motion pictures hadn't been invented yet, had they? Much less film strips? Also, what's the image circle of that lens? I'll bet it's quite large -- really good for large format then.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks guys!

cooltouch wrote:
Very nice! I'm curious, though -- what sort of projection was being done in 1904? Motion pictures hadn't been invented yet, had they? Much less film strips? Also, what's the image circle of that lens? I'll bet it's quite large -- really good for large format then.


No idea really. Obviously a new development, as it was a store sales sample to be used to convince prospective buyers.
The lens is rather small, and its image circle at infinity is approx 60-70mm, not really that large, but large enough for cine film projection.


Last edited by kds315* on Wed Jul 11, 2018 8:07 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congrats Like 1 Like 1


PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Very nice! I'm curious, though -- what sort of projection was being done in 1904? Motion pictures hadn't been invented yet, had they? Much less film strips? Also, what's the image circle of that lens? I'll bet it's quite large -- really good for large format then.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinetoscope
A process using roll film first described in a patent application submitted in France and the U.S. by French inventor Louis Le Prince, the concept was also used by U.S. inventor Thomas Edison in 1889, and subsequently developed by his employee William Kennedy Laurie Dickson between 1889 and 1892.[1] Dickson and his team at the Edison lab also devised the Kinetograph, an innovative motion picture camera with rapid intermittent, or stop-and-go, film movement, to photograph movies for in-house experiments and, eventually, commercial Kinetoscope presentations.
Kinetoscope.... Meyer Kinon, hmmm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Movie_projector
The Lumière brothers invented the first successful movie projector. They made their first film, Sortie de l'usine Lumière de Lyon, in 1894, which was publicly screened at L'Eden, La Ciotat a year later. The first commercial, public screening of cinematographic films happened in Paris on 28 December 1895.[2] The cinematograph was also exhibited at the Paris Exhibition of 1900.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-movie-projector-demonstrated-in-united-states
On this day in 1895, Woodville Latham and his sons, Otway and Gray, demonstrate their “Panopticon,” the first movie projector developed in the United States.

https://ourpastimes.com/the-history-of-the-movie-projector-12180892.html


PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So from that it was no wonder that mcompany MEYER has developed some projection lens
as early as 1904 and that as a store demo lens to start marketing and selling those!

Thanks for your research!