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Melissa - March 2007
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 2:13 am    Post subject: Melissa - March 2007 Reply with quote

My Helios-40 has just come back after fungus cleaning. A good reason to celebrate with a photograph:



direct link:

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/1996/melissa20070309cecb4.jpg


PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has quite mystic feeling I like your Melissa photos much!


PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
It has quite mystic feeling I like your Melissa photos much!


Me too! They're becoming like the Helga paintings by Andrew Wyeth. Wink
EDIT: To explain, Wyeth used the same subject in several of his
masterpieces. Orio, the bokeh is superb, shot this fairly wide open,
right? And the 5D...

Bill


PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations, Orio!
Good to have this beloved lens back, right?

Carsten


PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

katastrofo wrote:

Me too! They're becoming like the Helga paintings by Andrew Wyeth. Wink
EDIT: To explain, Wyeth used the same subject in several of his
masterpieces. Orio, the bokeh is superb, shot this fairly wide open,
right? And the 5D...
Bill


If I could sell my Melissa snapshots at the same prices of Wyeth paintings, then I would be able to buy 100 copies of the 4/20Flek without a sigh Laughing

The shot is totally wide open, yes. But the flare + yellowed coating combination was so bad, that I had to make a B&W conversion of the photograph. The sharpness, however, is always there. These Helios engineers really knew what they were doing.
Often, the Russian lenses are said derived from earlier Zeiss or Schneider lens models. I really wonder if there is an unrecognized "ancestor" to the Helios-40 or if it is a totally new USSR design.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LucisPictor wrote:
Congratulations, Orio!
Good to have this beloved lens back, right?

Carsten


It is. Although the cleaning has erased the coating in part on an inner glass element. This does not have a tremendous impact on the images (I can only notice it on one picture I shoot, almost backlight, in a situation that would be a very hard test even for the more recent Helios lenses). But it somehow defaces the look. For which I am sorry. But I guess it was unavoidable: either this, or keeping the fungi.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Orio. I'm afraid that's right.
Since fungus lives on coating, you'll have to remove some of it when you remove the fungus.

Actually, I'm sure it was the better choice to get rid of the fungus!

Carsten


PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

100% crop of Planar 1.4/85 wide open image (link):

http://img463.imageshack.us/img463/5936/melissa8982cf1.jpg


PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LucisPictor wrote:
Since fungus lives on coating, you'll have to remove some of it when you remove the fungus.


Just a dumb question... so all the lens around pre WW-II or around '20-'30.. whcih never had any coating are fungus proof...


PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ballu wrote:

Just a dumb question... so all the lens around pre WW-II or around '20-'30.. whcih never had any coating are fungus proof...


I don't think so. The coating may facilitate the development of the fungus, but what is sure is that the fungus after the coating starts etching the glass, too.
It may be a slower process, but it happens for sure, and this is when (and because) you have to trash the lens. If it's only a matter of the coating, the lens can still work.

Heck, the algae in the Atlantic are literally eating the iron and steel parts of the Titanic!


PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...and there is the glue or the lens cement. Fungus spawn surely can live on that, these little bastards. Wink


PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LucisPictor wrote:
...and there is the glue or the lens cement. Fungus spawn surely can live on that, these little bastards. Wink


Cant even imagine.. 100+ years of optics (photography lens.. 400+ years if telescope industry is taken into consideration), we dont have any research/work going on in fungi-resistant materials. If companies are doing, they must have advertized.
Although we have Dolly "The Sheep" roaming in the grasslands of Scotland, and eating Peach thinking Apple Surprised Shocked Very Happy