Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Magic Forest Series - Final Image
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 11:58 pm    Post subject: Magic Forest Series - Final Image Reply with quote

Between Jes's new acquisition of the Yashica Mat, and Dave's Pentacon 6, I was inspired to scan another trannie!

Oh GREAT, there goes Laurence again... Laughing

But, it's fun, and besides it gets me one step closer to having everything finally digitized.

I'll try to make this a series. I'll line up a few other transparencies from this fantastic forest.

This image is actually sharp. There is a lot of mist in the air. Right after a gentle but WET rain, and then the mist broke open.

I was able to get high up on a log, possibly 12 feet (4 meters) off the ground! Shocked I imagine that was quite a sight, with me teetering on the log and jamming the tripod down in a balancing act!

But this gave me the perspective I was looking for. If I had taken it at ground level, the rays would have been in a poor perspective in relation to the trees.

Deep Forest Light

Yashica Mat 124
f:8, 1/15th
Fuji Provia



Last edited by Laurence on Fri Feb 08, 2008 11:39 pm; edited 2 times in total


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Magical indeed!


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 12:38 am    Post subject: Re: Magic Forest Series - Medium Format Reply with quote

Laurence wrote:
Between Jes's new acquisition of the Yashica Mat, and Dave's Pentacon 6, I was inspired to scan another trannie!



Larry, your always superb pictures have been (and are) a source of motivation and inspiration to me. But I'm sure the quality of your pictures doesn't depend on the camera you're using, the secret is in the eye behind the viewfinder...
(I could say the same for all the other colleagues.)
The same must say for my shots... but in the opposite sense. Even with a Yashica-Mat in my hands, I doubt I can reach even half of your level...
However, I love to take pictures and it's funny to me, even if the results are not always showable... Wink

Jes.


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 2:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wait!....Stop!....What's that noise? There, behind the tree, is that a Leprechaun? NO! It's the Jabberwock!

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought --
So rested he by the Tumtum Tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!




The topsy-turvy boardwalk makes all those weird bends, and then the rails seem to bend away in an anomalous manner. When I saw the tree, I immediately thought of "The Jabberwock" by Lewis Carroll!

Anyway, this forest near the Cape Flattery is the absolute farthest northwesterly point in the United States continent, so maybe that's why everything is somehow "not quite of this Earth". Shocked Twisted Evil Mr. Green

Tumtum Tree
Pentax 645
Vega 12B 90/2.8
Exposure unrecorded (too scared!)



PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Larry

Something else! How often have I seen light like that in a wood or forest and either not had the camera or its gone by the time I dither my way around looking "for the perfect spot". You just up and shoot it perfectly. Very Happy Very Happy


patrickh


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pretty cool Larry Cool I have been down most of those "boardwalk trails" I hope many others who enjoy these shots you show from the peninsula will come and visit them also. I have a trip planned to PA this weekend. Hopefully I can make a winter visit to the trails on the coast. It is very inspirational to see some of your experiences here on this site Smile


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow! this Tumtum is magical


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What tree is that, Laurence?
Very interesting. You have gourgeous nature there.


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your pictures and the story have a magical aura to me. The light rays between the trees and the wood path, just great. I wish I would be there.


Imre


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hope you're not bored of "wonderful"Wink


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Richard_D wrote:
Hope you're not bored of "wonderful"Wink


This is not our problem, Richard, it's his one. Very Happy
Here is another "wonderful"!
Thanks for sharing!

Michael


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even the floor of this magic forest has surprises -- none other than a colorful Amanita muscaria!

And you just have some kind of mushroom
And your mind is moving slow
Go ask Alice
I think she'll know
... Jefferson Airplane

Alice's Magic Mushroom
Pentax 645
Vega 28B 120/2.8 + 2x Teleconverter
f:16, 1/2 second
Ektachrome



PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Beautiful!


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can imagine the dwarfs dancing below Smile.

Jes.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 3:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow... just, wow.
It looks like I'll be trying some Fuji film in the P6.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful mushroom! Is it called "fly agaric" in English? Its red is matching with green very well. These mushrooms are also very popular in Poland Cool


PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the ending shot of this little series. Thanks for the encouragement! Also, I now have four more images locked into hard drive and CD! Thank you for that! I am needing to get more plastic sleeves for my binder, it's almost full. Confused

The pioneering species at the edge of the surf tends to act as a "buffer" for the inland trees. These "protectors" tend to form a line up and down the coast that is only several hundered meters deep toward the inland forest.

These trees take the brunt of the weather, and also tend to be enveloped in a lot of mist and fog. This mist brings organics in from the Pacific basin, and these organics tend to cause mutation growth of many of the trees. Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis) is especially predisposed for this. I understand from the botanists that this does not harm the trees.

Mystery
Pentax 645
Zeiss Flektogon 65/2.8
f:8, 1/30
Kodachrome 64



PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fantastic!
Next time you go there, would you please be able to shoot for me a couple of closeups of the bark of Picea sitchensis?
And a couple of closeups of twigs, complete (with no cut out parts), possibly with behind a black or white or bright red cardboard (to facilitate cutout in Photoshop).
thank you!!


PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2008 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Fantastic!
Next time you go there, would you please be able to shoot for me a couple of closeups of the bark of Picea sitchensis?
And a couple of closeups of twigs, complete (with no cut out parts), possibly with behind a black or white or bright red cardboard (to facilitate cutout in Photoshop).
thank you!!


I will! I have it written down on my photography notepad.

The bark of Sitka Spruce is different in texture near the surf line, than it is inland. The pure stands of giant trees in the Quinault Valley for instance, are like overlapping scales of a giant fish. The trees themselves are averaging around 4 meters in diameter, and go on for miles. It becomes a sort of triple-culture, with the presence of Vine Maples, Sword Ferns, and Upland Huckleberry always present within the drip zone of the Sitka Spruce trees.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2008 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing series. The first and the last are wonderful in particular.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2008 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another wowzer set, Larry! My fave is the shroom, but all are spectacular
shots!

Bill


PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2008 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You just go from strength to strength Laurence


patrickh


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another wonderful shot.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wish to thank ALL of you for the inspiring comments! I feel very gratified to see that my images are liked.

By the way, I DON'T eat those mushrooms, and wouldn't suggest it in any way! If you do eat them, count on part of your liver turning to mush....yack! People have eaten the Amanita (fly agaric) to produce hallucinations - but it has been found in most cases that later examinations show liver damage. Or, in the case of overdoing it ... death.

These forests are certainly wonderful around here, and I feel lucky to have them nearby.

Thanks again, all!


PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The term "a master of his art" springs to mind. Fantastic images Laurence and thanks for sharing them....as someone else said, a source of inspiration Very Happy