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Landscape Photography with a Fisheye
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2016 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

argyle wrote:
Fisheyes are great for landscape shooting...Horseshoe Bend on the Colorado River in Page, Arizona:



Below, another interpretation of the Horseshoe Bend, extracted from the book "The Art of Photography" by Bruce Barnbaum. The idea is not to say which picture is better (both are excelent!), but just to show the difference between a fisheye and a rectilinear wide-angle lens.



Comments by the author Bruce Barnbaum:
The unimaginable symmetry of nature on a grand scale drew me to make this photograph. To accentuate that
symmetry, I photographed directly toward the cliffs across the 180-degree turn. To reveal the triangular rock below,
which serves as a fulcrum balancing the photograph, I placed the two front tripod legs within an inch of the 700-foot
cliff edge. The sun had just set to the left of the frame. The central cliff appears brightened, but it was not touched in
the printing; instead, all the cliffs and lower slopes around the bend were dodged continuously during the basic
exposure, then selectively bleached to balance the extreme brightness of the central rock, which seemed to be lit from
within. The unexplainable lighting makes the scene even more astounding to behold.


PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for taking us along on your journey to becoming the fantastic photographer that you are!
I did not know how to do it in Photoshop. You will also like this http://fixthephoto.com/blog/retouch-tips/double-exposure-in-photoshop.html


PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another horseshoe bend, this one in Northern California:



Quote:
The Eel River near Bridge Creek Road on the Avenue of the Giants south of Myers Flat at Eagle Point. Drone photo by Christina Lombardi


From http://kymkemp.com/2019/04/28/chronicle-visits-humboldt-spends-most-of-its-time-north-of-eureka-whats-up-with-that/


PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few samples, taken nearly ten years ago in the wild forests above Lugano/Switzerland.





At least at first one would not recognize them as "typical fisheye" photos (no de-fishing was applied).

Stephan