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Kodak "B&W" C-41 Self Portrait
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:02 am    Post subject: Kodak "B&W" C-41 Self Portrait Reply with quote

Scanner: Canoscan 700f
Lens: Helios 44m
Film: Kodak C-41 process B&W 400
Camera: Zenit B

This was one of the first rolls I ever shot and maybe the first ever with my beloved zenit B. Used on a self timer and focused with an object that I replaced (may have missed my face slightly). Unfortunately there is some scanner streaking...despite cleaning the glass very carefully.

Thanks for looking!
~Marc



Last edited by themoleman342 on Sat Jul 25, 2009 1:32 am; edited 2 times in total


PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good exposure, Marc, nice pensive pose. The things next to your head
are Newton Rings. Did you use the filmholders with this Canon?


PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes I used the film-holder but it is more of a framing indicator. It is a considerably asinine system for a scanner released this year. I'm thinking the light source does not create enough pressure to hold the strip down flat even with the cover down. Maybe a bit of weight on top will help...

Thanks for the comments
~Marc


PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as I know, Newton rings are created by glass...


PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From my understanding it is the space between the negative and glass that creates the effect. Maybe I'm wrong...


PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

themoleman342 wrote:
From my understanding it is the space between the negative and glass that creates the effect. Maybe I'm wrong...


No you are right. As the spacing varies you get alternating constructive and destructive interference. The classic demonstration involves a planar convex lens sitting (convex side down) on a plane surface. At the point of contact the gap is zero but it gradually increases as you move away from the centre. Hence the circular nature of the interference patterns and the name "rings"