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Kodachrome 25 Circa 1982
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 1:09 am    Post subject: Kodachrome 25 Circa 1982 Reply with quote

July 4th 1982 to be exact. I just got a scanner today and been playing with some stuff I haven't seen in forever. Canon AE-1 w/50mm1.8 most likely and exposure forgotten. Climbed onto the hotel roof for these.

Last edited by MartinCrabtree on Sun Apr 19, 2015 11:48 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 3:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last one is especially beautiful!


PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 5:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great old Kodachromes. I have ones that date back almost that far back -- 1983 to be exact.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like the fireworks.......was the camera on semi auto? or did you select shutter time manually?


PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I imagine the camera was set to a fixed (slow) shutter speed. The AE1 auto would not have worked with this type of image.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The exposures are lost to time however the AE-1 is shutter priority so I did set the speeds. Frankly I had eaten so much LSD that night these shots are nothing more than pure luck. Shortly after the top photo was taken a very large police officer appeared out of nowhere and told us in no uncertain terms it was time to get off the roof. The foibles of youth. Shocked

At that time of my life I was just "takin' pitchers". Had no clue what I was doing. Yet some of my work I like the most is from that time. Seeing this stuff after so much time has passed has given me pause. I do believe I'm trying too hard these days.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I took some photos that are the same type as these shortly after buying my AE-1, and I've done it many times since. This is what I did. I set my 50mm lens to f/16, shutter speed to B and kept it open for the duration of the individual firework. Then for multi-exposures, I kept pushing in the film rewind button on the bottom to recock the shutter. For the fireworks finale -- which is where they shoot off a bunch all at once -- I just left the shutter open on "B" for the entire last multiple burst. The only problem I've found with the finale is there is so much fireworks going off that often there's a lot of smoke associated with it, and sometimes the smoke obscures some of the image.

Here's a tip I learned from experience regarding taking pics of fireworks. Don't trip the shutter when you see the burst because if you do there will be a blank spot in the middle of the burst. This was where the initial explosion took place, but wasn't recorded because you were watching for the bursts. What you want to do is listen. When they shoot off those big fireworks, it sounds like a mortar being fired. You'll hear a dull *thump* and often you can see a trail of sparks as the firework ascends. So what you want to do is open the shutter when you hear the *thump*. This will also often catch that rising trail of sparks in the photo as well, which can make things look even more interesting.

MartinCrabtree wrote:

At that time of my life I was just "takin' pitchers". Had no clue what I was doing. Yet some of my work I like the most is from that time. Seeing this stuff after so much time has passed has given me pause. I do believe I'm trying too hard these days.


I know exactly what you mean. I look back at some of my earliest photos -- back when I didn't know nuttin' -- and many of them are quite good. What you're seeing when you look at these early photos is your natural talent, your "eye," if you will. As a person learns the craft of photography, often one forgets about ones natural abilities as one loads his head up with the rules that must be used, and somewhere along the line, the "talent" gets overlooked. The trick, I've found, is to be able to bring the talent back into the craft and let it thrive along with the rules that I've acquired over the years. When I manage to do this is when I'm often shooting my best work.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZpaNJqF4po

Wink