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In honour of Remembrance Day . . .
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 4:55 am    Post subject: In honour of Remembrance Day . . . Reply with quote

On Tuesday - November 11 - is Remembrance Day, to honour our veterans and the fallen in past conflicts.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day
Quote:
In Flanders FieldsIn Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
Lt.-Col. John McCrae

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Flanders_Fields

Thinking about this and our diverse community inspired me to write this thread.
I wanted to commend any of our members who have served their countries, as this day is to honour you as well. This extends to those who currently are members of their countries reserves/national guard/ militias etc, for you too serve.
I was lucky enough as a teen ager to have belonged to the Royal Canadian Army Cadets - who are considered to be secondary reserve. This helped to shape who I am and it also gave me the experience to know that the Regular forces were not my calling.

The biggest thing about Remembrance Day is to remember why it is observed - War and the loss of life. There is a line from our Remberance Day services that simply goes . . .Lest we forget. Remembering encourages peace.

It is my greatest wish for all those who serve that in our time we do not have to ask you to pay the greatest price . . .

Jim


PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well said


PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a nice surprise when we played at the Remembrance Service on Sunday. In previous years at one point in the service we normally play the national anthems of France, USA and GB. France because the town has a twinning link (Partnerstadt) with Marly-le-Roi in France, and USA because there was a large USAF base close by. This year was different. The base has been closed down for a few years now, so instead of "The Star Spangled Banner" we played a different one - HUNGARY!!

The town where the band is based, Marlow, has recently set up a new town twinning link with Budavar, an area of Budapest! Smile The link is because the old chain suspension bridge across the Danube in Budapest, the
Szchenyi Lnchd
, was built by the British engineer, William Tierney Clark, who had previously built a similar old bridge across the Thames in Marlow in 1832.

So, Attila, there is a strong chance the band will be playing in Budapest one day! Very Happy Very Happy


PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shocked Wow! That would be great ! I will bring my brother he has also a small German band Laughing


PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the UK we had Remembrance Sunday which was the Sunday before the 11th. The 2 events I attended had a excellent turn out and were very moving

Here are some of my photos from the day
http://roblesliephotography.blogspot.com/2008/11/remembrance-sunday.html


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Next week there will be the commemoration again. I believe that it's very important to not forget the men who died to serve their nation. In my family we are two veterans, my father in law who served as a conscript in the Algeria war and myself. Both of us are decorated for "bravery in face of the enemy". In his case it's merited because he saved his unit in an ambush. In my case it belongs more to a lottery But we never goes to the commemoration because here in our town there are only lads who never fought but still have the medals given to them for the reason of long-time service Both of us lost friends in action, and nobody (expect their family) remembers them.

As one of my Sergeant-Majors said : "The real heroes are dead, we just have the merit to survive"


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the US, it is called Memorial Day and comes at the end of May. Here is a shot of my wife and child at a 2005 memorial day. My wife's uncle is here, and we visit his grave each memorial day.




Jules

(Balda Super Pontura, 120mm Schneider lens, 6x9 neg, Ilford Pan-X, Rodinal)


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here November 4th is also national holiday but for different reason - it's anniversary of victory in WW1


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have no holiday, no memorial day for our heroes , due we lost in past conflicts. We have memorial day, holiday for foreign winners. If anybody want to remember for our heroes need to face to face with police.Thousands who lost their life for Hungary have no remember just at family places and in heart of people.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's sad Attila,Australia celebrates/remembers one of it's greastest defeats/disastors at Gallipoli.For the huge loss of young lives.Anyone who is willing to give up their life deserves rememberance.Least we forget Crying or Very sad


PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To all people who is died in any conflicts at any sides , well deserved for remembering. We must remember for them who is died for our lands.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In Finland fallen soldiers are remembered on the Independece Day, December 6th. The idea behind it that we wouldn't be independent without the wars.

(wars = WWII that is divided into two-three parts here: 39-40 against Soviet Union and 41-44 against Soviet Union and 44-45 against Germany.)


PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On Sunday I shall be playing in the band at our local Remembrance Service in Marlow, as every year. Besides our own national services and organisations we usually have representatives from the USAF who are based close by, and from our twin towns, Marly-le-Roi in France and Budavar, a district of Budapest which Attila will know. Everyone is dressed in their best parade uniforms. We play a few quiet hymns during the service and wreath-laying, then the names of all the fallen are read out and one of the band plays The Last Post and Reveille on a cornet. The most moving part of the service is the two minute silence at exactly 11.00am, which is started and finished by the loud boom of a field gun not far away, which must bring back terrible memories for some. The flags are lowered, the rifles are reversed, everybody bows their head and there is complete silence. After the service we play the three National Anthems and then a Scottish regimental band in full Scottish dress, playing bagpipes and drums, leads everybody past the War Memorial to pay their respects.

I'm going to take my camera this year and take a few pics if I can, but it's difficult to grab picture opportunities in between playing.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mo-Fo wrote:
That's sad Attila,Australia celebrates/remembers one of it's greastest defeats/disastors at Gallipoli.For the huge loss of young lives.Anyone who is willing to give up their life deserves rememberance.Least we forget Crying or Very sad

Mo-Fo, I was fortunate to be visiting Sydney on ANZAC day in 2006 and I watched the parade where it finished at the War Memorial in Hyde Park. I was amazed how many people were marching, it took well over 3 hours for everyone to arrive. Very impressive and moving occasion.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was thinking about killed soldiers I've known well or being concerned by my family.

3 (great)uncles (1 in the austrian civil war 1934, 1 at Moscow, 1 at Stalingrad)

Austrian army : Staff sergeant F, plane crash

French Foreign Legion :
(in order they died)
Private M. (France) Bosnia, my promotion
Private 1st Class C. (Spain), French Guyana
Corporal P. (Hungary) French Guyana
Sergeant G. (Germany), killed by a sniper in Sarajevo
Private 1st Class Z. (Poland) French Guyana
Corporal K. (UK), shot twice at Sarajevo, Medaille Militaire and died in French Guyana
Corporal G. (France), Brazzavile Congo

The most painful loss was Corporal P., we shared the room together and he had to die a few days before the birth of his child I'll never forget the message on the radio, I'couldn't believe it.

Some other comrades where killed in stupid accidents or suicides

Since I left the army some of my friends get injured but nobody died.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hard ! Most people can't imagine including me...


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For sure it's sometimes hard, but there where some good moments with them too.
But sometime it will come up again later. I remember when I was with my (now) spouse at Monteux to see the fireworks. The first minutes I just wanted to duck, was a real strange feeling. Or every time I make Palatschinken (pancakes) for my daughters I have to think about P. and the great time we had cooking austro-hungarian food the week-end.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the most important thing at least to remember for heroes who are died in fights. To not remember for our soldiers what our politicians doing is a big shame in my opinion , soldiers couldn't select what is good what is wrong they lost their life for us.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Once the mother of my former girl-friend found one of my "papers" and she said : " You never old as that you being a hero!" My answer was : "I'm not a hero, only stupid enough to do this kind of things."


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andreas wrote:
Once the mother of my former girl-friend found one of my "papers" and she said : " You never old as that you being a hero!" My answer was : "I'm not a hero, only stupid enough to do this kind of things."


Basically agree, to being professional soldier a choice , a stupid choice in my opinion too, but in past people had no choice.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my soldiers was an arab from the "Banlieu"; When I asked him why he choosed the Legion he answered me : "Sir, to earn some money I only had two choices, either dealing drugs or join the Legion. I prefer to fight."
So, sometimes the choice isn't really a choice. I never wanted to become a legionary. Circumstances in my life made me an elite soldier, that's all.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andreas wrote:
One of my soldiers was an arab from the "Banlieu"; When I asked him why he choosed the Legion he answered me : "Sir, to earn some money I only had two choices, either dealing drugs or join the Legion. I prefer to fight."
So, sometimes the choice isn't really a choice. I never wanted to become a legionary. Circumstances in my life made me an elite soldier, that's all.


So you had also no other choice , this is confirm what I told before we must remember for our soldiers no matter when they died and under which power.

We still have Russian soldier monument in city of Budapest what is right , but must be there German and Hungarian too.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I lost one of my uncles in WWII, of course I never knew him.
My grandfather survived three wars (WWI, Ethiopia, and WWII), but he was captured in Tobruk and spent 3-4 years as war prisoner in India. But he was a real tough man and came back in good condition.
One of my grand-uncles instead was also captured in WWII somewhere in Jugoslavija by Titus army. He spent about one year prisoner and came home in very critical physical and mental state, almost near insanity.

A lot of people here died during WWII, on both sides, either as soldiers supporting Germans or as partisans supporting allies. On the hills that you see pictured many times by me, there were the hides of a lot of partisan armies.
A lot of civilians died too in the bombings, because my hometown, which has a lot of luxury hotels, was chosen as SS headquarters. It is in fact a little miracle that I am here writing, because both my father and my mother, then children, were almost killed by Spitfire raids.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote