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I think I've finally found it
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 11:18 pm    Post subject: I think I've finally found it Reply with quote

I've frequently struggled with obtaining what I consider acceptable processing
of images to tame both sharpening and noise. With the new 5D4, I've a new impetus
to try things differently. Surely the camera itself plays a role in this, but I've gone back
to trying Adobe Camera Raw for what I've read about as being a very good tool.

It seems I'm moving in the right direction.
5D4, 28-135 IS USM, f/8, ISO 8000, 1/125:



What this image is to me, is a large improvement in both sharpening and noise reduction.
Most of my previous attempts have seemed lacking in sharpening which did not seem
harsh or intense, while high-ISO noise reduction has been very disappointing at best.
This is certainly much more to my liking than most of my previous attempts.
I see a clear and smooth image, finally.

As this image was taken at ISO 8000, which I would never have attempted with any
of my previous cameras, it certainly does speak well of the 5D4's capabilities.
In particular, there was a significant amount of noise in the front tire's whitewall
shadow near the top under the fender, which I was able to watch nearly disappear
as I made adjustments. Reflections on the chrome were also significantly tamed
while also smoothing out and defining their points, at the same time reducing what
I would describe as 'scattering' or mosaicing.

Another benefit of the camera seems to be how well it captures in a difficult
lighting situation. You can see the spotlights and their reflections all over the place,
and there are many exhibits with daylight windows behind them. Light shines into
the lens at nearly any given point, and I forgot to take a CPL filter with me.

The venue is the Gilmore Car Museum in Hickory Corners, Michigan.
They hold one of the most significant collections of automotive history in the US.

Conclusion:
A far better-refined capturing source combined with a renewed effort, has resulted
in far greater ease of achieving improvement. Yay! Very Happy


PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2019 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I can only see the Duesenberg. My dream car when I get the triple rollover on the lottery.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2019 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
Sorry, I can only see the Duesenberg. My dream car when I get the triple rollover on the lottery.


Hehe. Yeah, now the wife wants one. Rolling Eyes
Somehow, I don't think a one-off Duesy is within our means.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2019 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your new camera is on a totally different level from mine (as in vastly superior) but one thing we do share is a fondness for ACR. I've been using it for a few years now and I find it does such a great job -- it's very flexible and everything it does tends to be excellent -- that I often seldom need to perform any further processing to my images. A really remarkable product.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Your new camera is on a totally different level from mine (as in vastly superior) but one thing we do share is a fondness for ACR. I've been using it for a few years now and I find it does such a great job -- it's very flexible and everything it does tends to be excellent -- that I often seldom need to perform any further processing to my images. A really remarkable product.
I'm slowly learning the same, Michael, but not until the 5D4.

Attempts with 40D and 50D files were disappointing, at best.
The most successes I've had from those cameras came after basic exposure adjustments with ACR,
them sending to PS(CS6) for further adjustments. ACR was simply escaping me in use for NR
and sharpening. This has changed with 5D4 files, and gives me reason to try again with the 50D.

The 5D4 requires me to convert to DNG with Adobe's converter, which is simple enough,
albeit an extra step. I had looked into RawTherapee and others for some of the same ACR
functions to pass directly to PS from a RAW file, but I never found a way to do so, so
I succumbed to the DNG converter. As I don't care to lease or rent software, CS6 will remain
in my arsenal until a suitable alternative comes along.


PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since you are in the what can Raw Algorithms do for me, there is a bit of love for Darktable at the moment, check it out if you are yet too?

https://www.darktable.org/


PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2019 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tromboads wrote:
Since you are in the what can Raw Algorithms do for me, there is a bit of love for Darktable at the moment, check it out if you are yet too?

https://www.darktable.org/


I've looked at that option a few times recently, but have yet to give it a test-drive.
Could it be said that some of the program's workflow and naming conventions
are similar enough to PS to make it easy for one to pick up fairly well?

One reason I've resisted leaving PS is due to the fact there are comparatively
about zero tutorials or instructions for these freeware programs.


PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah i found it from a small amount of PS usage and felt my way around it pretty quickly.

Its exactly $0, give it ago Razz