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How to store the photos?
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 12:57 pm    Post subject: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

Until now I have never cared about this aspect but I want to improve to give a long life to the photos.

I usually print photographs in A4 and A3 format and lately I have relied on Digitalpix.it with excellent results. For these formats they use Fujicolor Crystal Archive Paper Supreme. The data sheet indicates the following:

Quote:
Since prints are usually used for the long term recording of images, as much effort as possible is made to use materials that exhibit the least amount of change over time. But the effects of high force during folding, light, heat, oxygen in the air, contaminating gases, humidity and mold cannot be completely avoided. Also the change in the photographic image or base material are minimized by maintaining the appropriate storage conditions for prints, such as those used by museums and art galleries. Temperature and humidity control is the most important key to minimizing the change that occurs in prints. Prints stored in the dark under the following conditions may be expected to show almost no change over time.

Storage period with almost no change - Temperature - Relative Humidity
More than 20 years - Below 10°C (50°F) - 30% — 50%
10/20 years - Below 25°C (77°F) - 30% — 50%

Notes on Prints Storage:
1. Prints should be inserted into albums, mounted, or placed into a bag (plastic*) for photographic prints before being stored.
*Made of polyester, polystyrene or polypropylene plastic, etc
2. Even during normal storage, it is recommended that prints be stored at a place as free as possible from hot and humid conditions, and away from direct illumination. The following are examples of undesirable storage conditions.

> Storage in a room closet facing a wall exposed to cold outside air (which may cause condensation).
> Storage in a place near the ceiling, such as an attic, the top of a closet or cupboard (where high temperatures may occur).

3. Storing prints with their front surfaces facing each other may result in unexpected problems. If the adjacent print placement is unavoidable, it is necesaary to keep the surface separated by, for example, the use of interleaving sheets of paper.


I was amazed by the declared "life" expectancy, can it be so short? I have family photos that are over 50/60 years old which, although poorly preserved, have kept very well. Current chemical technologies are worse than those of half a century ago.

I want to put the photos in polypropylene bags and then store them in archival boxes:

Bags : https://www.amazon.it/Favorit-400053790-Foratura-Universale-Confezione/dp/B014BE3K4I/ref=psdc_4290225031_t1_B000KT78VK
Boxes : https://www.amazon.it/dp/B00VAKYNB6

How do you do it?


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raw digital image files are stored on multiple hard drives.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
Raw digital image files are stored on multiple hard drives.

You wrote in the wrong thread


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:47 pm    Post subject: Re: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

TurtleSkinny wrote:
Until now I have never cared about this aspect but I want to improve to give a long life to the photos.

I usually print photographs in A4 and A3 format and lately I have relied on Digitalpix.it with excellent results. For these formats they use Fujicolor Crystal Archive Paper Supreme. The data sheet indicates the following:

Quote:
Since prints are usually used for the long term recording of images, as much effort as possible is made to use materials that exhibit the least amount of change over time. But the effects of high force during folding, light, heat, oxygen in the air, contaminating gases, humidity and mold cannot be completely avoided. Also the change in the photographic image or base material are minimized by maintaining the appropriate storage conditions for prints, such as those used by museums and art galleries. Temperature and humidity control is the most important key to minimizing the change that occurs in prints. Prints stored in the dark under the following conditions may be expected to show almost no change over time.

Storage period with almost no change - Temperature - Relative Humidity
More than 20 years - Below 10°C (50°F) - 30% — 50%
10/20 years - Below 25°C (77°F) - 30% — 50%

Notes on Prints Storage:
1. Prints should be inserted into albums, mounted, or placed into a bag (plastic*) for photographic prints before being stored.
*Made of polyester, polystyrene or polypropylene plastic, etc
2. Even during normal storage, it is recommended that prints be stored at a place as free as possible from hot and humid conditions, and away from direct illumination. The following are examples of undesirable storage conditions.

> Storage in a room closet facing a wall exposed to cold outside air (which may cause condensation).
> Storage in a place near the ceiling, such as an attic, the top of a closet or cupboard (where high temperatures may occur).

3. Storing prints with their front surfaces facing each other may result in unexpected problems. If the adjacent print placement is unavoidable, it is necesaary to keep the surface separated by, for example, the use of interleaving sheets of paper.


I was amazed by the declared "life" expectancy, can it be so short? I have family photos that are over 50/60 years old which, although poorly preserved, have kept very well. Current chemical technologies are worse than those of half a century ago.

I want to put the photos in polypropylene bags and then store them in archival boxes:

Bags : https://www.amazon.it/Favorit-400053790-Foratura-Universale-Confezione/dp/B014BE3K4I/ref=psdc_4290225031_t1_B000KT78VK
Boxes : https://www.amazon.it/dp/B00VAKYNB6

How do you do it?


The document for this paper indicates dye layers. Not sure if dye is limited by atmospherics could cross layers?

Most of the decay was related to oxidation or mechanical. Plenty of storage anecdotes listed.

Also mentioned often was brightness and special observer conditions. Could mean the use of fluorescent brighteners?

Post process and handling didn’t indicate problems with lifespan due to proper procedure.

The lifespan chart maybe wasn’t lifespan per day but observed changed based on time and conditions which appeared to be minimal as documented.

Never used this paper. How long has it been on the market?


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:52 pm    Post subject: Re: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

Blazer0ne wrote:
Never used this paper. How long has it been on the market?

I don't know Sad
Info : https://www.fujifilm.eu/it/prodotti/photo-finishing/p/fujicolor-crystal-archive-paper-supreme#overview

I have now read online that these prints have a life of 80 years if placed in the dark.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:14 pm    Post subject: Re: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

TurtleSkinny wrote:
Blazer0ne wrote:
Never used this paper. How long has it been on the market?

I don't know Sad
Info : https://www.fujifilm.eu/it/prodotti/photo-finishing/p/fujicolor-crystal-archive-paper-supreme#overview


The question was related to the time study chart.

Regarding prints. I have 25 year old prints from an Epson printer that used pigment ink framed and hanging on my wall.

A variety of papers were used. Media that contained brighteners is now yellowing or started to several years ago. Those prints have mostly been reprinted on new paper. Anything that was printed on archival paper that didn't use brighteners looks the same as original. Such as I can compare to a screen image. I also kept B copies on the backside of the frame. So, when I compare they are not as yellow as the exposed print, but still have change from the paper.

Nowadays, I print on paper that uses natural brighteners if any and continue to use pigment based color inkjet printers. Cotton Rag and Baryta, lately but you have to work around Gamut constraints and viewing conditions to achieve the best results. I see no reason why the pigment print on proper paper without brighteners would not last another 25 years.

I also have lab prints from 30-40 years ago that I have compared those to the original negatives scanned recently. I can say that even 4x6 glossy bulk print pharmacy store photos stored in a cheap photo album will still hold a good amount of original color. That is with zero consideration for archive.

Cheers