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How to Macro wide-angle
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:08 pm    Post subject: How to Macro wide-angle Reply with quote



This was taken with Fuji SL1000 bridge camera in super macro mode. Im new to macro. I want to take butterfly pictures with a similar style. The wider angle look but shallower and the focal point in this case a hoverfly with that look. The question is how using an DSLR. The butterfly is unlikely to allow you within a meter. So what lens set up would one use to get the above. Im not knew to photography just trying to nail a lens to start on this kind of look. Thanks.


PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Venus optica released a 15mm macro lens called Laowa 15mm f/4

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/2386312472/venus-optics-laowa-15mm-f4-worlds-widest-macro-lens


PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You may try a wide angle lens with extension tubes before buying a dedicated macro lens.


PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ive a nikon 24mm 2.8 AF. Can i stay at a meter and get this look with extension tubes only.


PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mark fewtrell wrote:
Ive a nikon 24mm 2.8 AF. Can i stay at a meter and get this look with extension tubes only.


It doesn't matter what lens you try you'll never get a wide angle environment close up from 1m.
Assuming 90° FOV is wide enough for you, and you have a 1" long subject. To get your subject to take up 1/4 of your FOV your lens must be within 2" of the subject.
As you reduce the FOV you can get further back, to reach a similar subject size for around 1m you need a FOV of the order of 5-6°.

If your going to get the wide angle close ups you're after you will need mcuh improved stalking skills (probably a case of set up the camera & wait for the subject).

If these shots were easy I'm sure we'd all be taking them Smile


PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Truer words have hardly ever been spoken! Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

Mark: I took the liberty to make this "angelic" question a more earthly one - "angle" Wink


PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought the physics unlikely. As for the angels let alone the angles a pin is the only way too stalk a butterfly and this I'll not do. And to you then thanks and adieu.


PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2015 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pros use to take butterfly pictures in the very early morning time, when the insect still is not that moveable and let them get much closer than later at the day. Makro seems to be an easy object, because everthing looks interesting at close and very close sight. But it's a hard job to get impressing view of the subject.
Guess why I don't post pictures here. Razz


PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2015 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, you can either use a tele macro 180, maybe tilted to fake the wide angle view (the flowers behind the insect get "over" it in the picture) or you will have to use a wideangle and get close.

What's the problem with getting close - it's how you shoot macro. Maybe a PROTIPP, bugs are optimised to detect rapid movements. They are not smart enough to see you when you move extremly slowly. This is also how to smash flies and gnats. Slowly get hand in place then thwack as fast as you can.


PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2015 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

duckrider wrote:
Pros use to take butterfly pictures in the very early morning time, when the insect still is not that moveable and let them get much closer than later at the day. Makro seems to be an easy object, because everthing looks interesting at close and very close sight. But it's a hard job to get impressing view of the subject.
Guess why I don't post pictures here. Razz


You don't like to stand up early in the morning?

BTW, also a very common trick: Catch the insect and put it into the freezer before shooting....
Not my style but often seen from others.

From my point of view the most important factor is the light. Therefore for Insects I prefer to use a ring flash as shown in this example:



Focus length 200mm for distance reasons (incl. Minolta close-up lens no. 2).


PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2015 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good catch, Thomas! Like 1


PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2015 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald wrote:
Very good catch, Thomas!


Thank you, Gerald.