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Help with negative scanning
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 8:40 pm    Post subject: Help with negative scanning Reply with quote

Hello everyone

Since my post is about scanning 35mm negatives to a computer, I don't know if I'm supposed to post this on the Darkroom or the Digital Darkroom. If this post is misplaced, please move it to the right section. Now let's get to it.

I am a novice film photographer, and I'm using an Epson V330 scanner coupled to a 2007 silver iMac, using Epson's software. My issue is that I have no negative holder, since this scanner has been with my family for a long time and has been at different offices before being home. I've shot about 15 or 20 rolls, and have scanned them by just dropping the negatives in the glass and hoping it was aligned, but I don't feel the scans are as sharp as the negatives seem to be. The seem a bit out of focus. I've searched for a separate holder on eBay and found some for around 30-40 dollars, shipping to Brazil included. I've also started searching for 3D-printed holders, but found none specific to my scanner model.

I would like to know how you people work with negatives and scanners, if you have any knowledge or experience with 3D-printed accessories for scanning, or have gone through the same problems I have described above.

Thank you and have a nice week

Josué


PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For better results you can use Canon T2i with macro lens, instead of scanner.


PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not invest in this scanner if you want to scan 35mm negatives. In this discipline this scanner is only mediocre and is unable to deliver really good scans.

For 35mm film format I would recommend to use a dedicated film scanner rather than a flatbed one which offers also special features for dust removal and restoring. However, good film scanners are still rather expensive, even second hand.

Paticularly if you scan negatives the used software for negative to positive conversion is important as well. Silverfast or VueScan are highly recommended.

Alternatively you may try to use a digital camera with special dedicated macro setup for slide copying or alike. That's far cheaper but also more cumbersome. A photo software for conversion and optimization is required as well.

If you don't have too much to scan a scan service may also be a valid option for consideration.

My setup is the Epson Perfection V600 Photo for larger film formats (4.5x6 to 6x9 cm) incl. picture scanning and the Minolta Dimage Scan 5400 for 35mm film, preferable reversal film. VueScan for scanning and Adobe Photoshop for further manipulation.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure if this helps you but this is how the holder should look like. This is from a V370 but I think it is the same as V330? If you decide to carv it yourself I can give you some more exact measurements. The film isn't actually very far from the glass considering the curvature of film, less tha 0,5 mm I think.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
For better results you can use Canon T2i with macro lens, instead of scanner.


I have tried and still try scanning negatives with the camera. Although sharpness is improved, the color is always bad when converting it. Is there a software to do it automatically? My Photoshop workflow is still unreliable.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tb_a wrote:
I would not invest in this scanner if you want to scan 35mm negatives. In this discipline this scanner is only mediocre and is unable to deliver really good scans.

For 35mm film format I would recommend to use a dedicated film scanner rather than a flatbed one which offers also special features for dust removal and restoring. However, good film scanners are still rather expensive, even second hand.

Paticularly if you scan negatives the used software for negative to positive conversion is important as well. Silverfast or VueScan are highly recommended.

Alternatively you may try to use a digital camera with special dedicated macro setup for slide copying or alike. That's far cheaper but also more cumbersome. A photo software for conversion and optimization is required as well.

If you don't have too much to scan a scan service may also be a valid option for consideration.

My setup is the Epson Perfection V600 Photo for larger film formats (4.5x6 to 6x9 cm) incl. picture scanning and the Minolta Dimage Scan 5400 for 35mm film, preferable reversal film. VueScan for scanning and Adobe Photoshop for further manipulation.


Thanks for the tips.

The V330 is not a scanner I'm considering buying, but is what I've got. What I'm considering buying is the negative holder for it. If a holder does make too much of a difference to be worth buying, that's my question. I know about shooting a raw file of the negatives to process them in Photoshop, but the colors never come out decent. I'm also looking for software that makes the conversion of a photograph, not depending on the scanner.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskalaCafe wrote:
I'm not sure if this helps you but this is how the holder should look like. This is from a V370 but I think it is the same as V330? If you decide to carv it yourself I can give you some more exact measurements. The film isn't actually very far from the glass considering the curvature of film, less tha 0,5 mm I think.


#1


#2


#3


I've seen those on eBay and that's one of the models I'm considering buying. Thanks for sharing the dimensions of it. Does the negative still keep its curvature after drying? Does it make too much of a difference when scanning? I've had issues with this when photographing the negatives with my camera.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jhayashileite wrote:
I'm also looking for software that makes the conversion of a photograph, not depending on the scanner.


Photoshop would be able to do that.

Maybe you check tutorials like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2gLT0SWzpQ
There are others as well. Google helps you further. Wink

Otherwise, if you activate your scanner, software like VueScan is able to do this automatically. There are existing profiles for almost every existing film.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a Canonscan FS4000US on a SCSI interface with VueScan https://www.hamrick.com/ software, which will work almost 6,000 scanners under Windows 10, MacOS or Linux. It's a 4000dpi unit giving an approximate 20Megapixel result from a full-frame 35mm negative or slide. There is a "try-before-you-buy" option that provides all features but watermarks the output, so you can establish if the program can work for you.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jhayashileite wrote:
visualopsins wrote:
For better results you can use Canon T2i with macro lens, instead of scanner.


I have tried and still try scanning negatives with the camera. Although sharpness is improved, the color is always bad when converting it. Is there a software to do it automatically? My Photoshop workflow is still unreliable.


http://www.jeffreysward.com/editorials/colorneg.htm


PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For better colors of scanned negs or positives are scanners welcome more than digital cameras. I moved from scanning with 600D and lightned from LCD and some macro setup of old CZJ Tessar at f5,6 where was sharpness beautiful to scanning on Epson V600. There I have mixed feelings about sometime mediocre results of 35mm negs but medium format negs and dia films are going through that scanner aswell. Can say that more pastel color and not so efficient contrast are problems anyway but more large format I scan better tiffs are go out of there. Although 4x5 inch and 12,5 x 17,5 cm large format had to stitch but it was not so hard. One can learn it quick. There is better V800. Also speed of my Epson scanner with my 20GB ram are now quite fast then. Rather say faster that I mess with somehow complicated Canon DSLR and all that process.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A big thank you to everyone that gave me tips on scanning negatives. I have just had my first 120 roll developed and hope to try to do everything I've been recommended. I will try to post my results as soon as possible.