Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

For Larry's enjoyment...
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 9:16 pm    Post subject: For Larry's enjoyment... Reply with quote

... and per Larry's request....here's a few samples of the Tessar 3.5/50 on the 50D Smile
I apologize for the boring subjects - in fact I took out the lens this morning when I went to Castell'Arquato to buy the farmer's cheese,
but unfortunately, I took with me the Exakta version! So I could only use the other Tessar there (the 2.8/50).
So I took these few shots in the afternoon on my balcony... I think that in spite of the subjects, they show that the little Tessar is still a very hard beast to beat!

Note: the photos were taken as SRAW2 (small raw 2), this means that they are small in pixel size. This explains why the detail crops are relatively small.

1- whole image


1- detail


2- whole image


2- detail


3- whole image


4- whole image


5- whole image


6- whole image


7- whole image


7- detail


8- whole image


8- detail


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are quite right about it being hard to beat Orio. The quality of the pictures is magnificent. That looks like virtually edge to edge sharpness.
Right light and it becomes 3D. Nice OOF


patrickh


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This morning I shot with the Tessar 2.8/50 in a much nicer environment.
The Tessar model was newer, but the results speak clearly in favour of the older lens. It has a fullness of image,
and dimensionality, that the 2.8/50 lacks for most part.
It is really amazing, this difference. One would say they should be close. THey are in fact world apart in quality.


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am honored that someone shot some images for my perusal!

Well, here we go again: the microdetail is STUNNING, and the three-dimensionality rears its beautiful head once more.
COLOR
CLARITY
SHARPNESS
SIGNATURE

It's astonishing how this old lens, manufactured no doubt by hand,
equals and beats a LOT of modern AF lenses.

As indicated above, the SIGNATURE is a compelling element for this lens.

Even the motorcycle image has a uniqueness of color and
dimensionality that makes me really LOOK throughout the image.

The minimalist leaf images simply rock my soul!

Also, I see some GREAT possibilities in the design of the windows
and wall filigrees on that wall behind the motorcycle!
Those designs could definitely be a part of another image.

I wish I was there to work it and discuss it with you, that would be fun!
We could put on our special hats and a glass of wine, and pretend
that we are some kind of classical photographers. Rolling Eyes Very Happy

EXTRAORDINARY


Last edited by Laurence on Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:13 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These are just humble test shots, but like you say Larry, the signature of the lens is there never the less!

What do you think of the bokeh in picture 2?


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
These are just humble test shots, but like you say Larry, the signature of the lens is there never the less!

What do you think of the bokeh in picture 2?


The bokeh just plain sucks. Nothing like you would get with say...a Canon AF L lens.

Joke!

In essence, this bokeh correlates to all of the other factors
that make this lens a fantastic piece of glass.

The sawtooth sharpness of the leaves is exquisitely tamed.
Look at the "edges" of the leaves in those out of focus areas!
Smooth, gradual, and beautiful. This aspect simply contributes
to the pleasing feel of even a "mundane" subject, and turns it
into something of literal value to the observer.

Also, if I had the 5D, I think it would be a long time before I
considered some kind of upgrade. It really has it all in the
world of DSLRs. I wouldn't think more bells and whistles
would be paramount to making a change in cameras.


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back on that second image (sawtooth leaves), one only needs
to glance down and right at the grillwork pattern to marvel at the bokeh. Shocked

Also, the red spot in the background is probably garish
in the real world view, but this lens diminishes the
harshness - not only by gradating the color, but by not
allowing double-lines on the edges! Remarkable.


PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just above the grillwork is that (concrete?) horizontal structure.
Look at the dance of colors, and the way they complement
each other! Notwithstanding that those might be stains, or simply
paint that is wearing away, please note the interrelationship of
the peach color to the blue color! It is steady, repetitive, and
luxurious.