Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Filter cleaning
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2019 3:56 pm    Post subject: Filter cleaning Reply with quote

What do members use for cleaning their filters, both glass and plastic?
I ask because I have difficulty cleaning my glass polarising filters without leaving some slight smudges on them. Maybe it just shows up more easily on these filters than others. I avoid using liquid on polarisers in case some gets between the two glass surfaces. I just breathe on them and polish with a lens cleaning cloth.


PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2019 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Same techniques as with lenses. Smile

New Pec Pads with drop of Eclipse (reagent grade methanol). Surfaces collect all sorts of grime over time requiring several passes to get it all off. Final spot clean using earbuds/q-tips.

As with lenses taking apart filters allows for more thorough cleaning.


PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2019 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My cleaning routine will depend very much on what needs cleaning off.
Gentle lens style cleaning will generally be first, especially if out in the field. Despite my huge collection of filters I've not often needed more than that.

For glass filters I might just go straight to acetone (it's plentiful in our lab and shifts most things - but dissolves many plastics so care is needed)
Oil / fingerprints etc. on plastic filters I'll generally try iso-octane first and iso-propanol as a second option.
For inorganic marks I'd use DI water or 'Decon 90' followed by iso-propanol...
In each case I'd make use of the ultrasonics bath if marks are stubborn.

Friends who don't work in a chemistry lab, frequently just stick them in the dishwasher. I've never tried that approach.


PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2019 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to wear nitrile gloves otherwise skin oils will transfer onto the lens cloth.

Sometimes Zeiss Lens cleaner will not float the oil good enough to soak it up. I will use a small amount of naptha or 90 percent iso, then revisit with the standard lens cleaner.

I don't like iso that much because it dries so fast that you have to be extra careful not to wipe with a dry cloth. With a filter it shouldn't matter if you use a little extra juice - Don't do that with an assembled lens!

I also suggest that you clean the edge of the glass with separate cloth than the central area. In order words the edge or perimeter tends to remain a dirty little pocket and you don't want to transfer all that to the center.

Also, never reuse any cloth. Don't drop it or set it on the table. Never touch a cloth with bare hands.

Zeiss has a an excellent guide on cleaning objectives for microscopes can be found on their site, or any college lab resource.


Happy Dog


PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Usually I do the same as you, Edgar, and just breath on them, then wipe them with a clean cloth or lens tissue. This is usually good enough, unless they're unusually dirty, in which case I'll resort to lens cleaning fluid. As long as you're careful, you won't get any fluid between the glass in your polarizers. I've never found it to be an issue.


PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Usually I do the same as you, Edgar, and just breath on them, then wipe them with a clean cloth or lens tissue. This is usually good enough, unless they're unusually dirty, in which case I'll resort to lens cleaning fluid. As long as you're careful, you won't get any fluid between the glass in your polarizers. I've never found it to be an issue.


Yep, I believe carefully breathing on a lens counts as using distilled water.

A great method for cleaning while in the field. Like 1 small


PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Among many things, breath usually contains 'an amount' of Hydrogen Peroxide, which, if nothing else, will work in this case as an extremely mild steriliser. On the other hand it is also an oxidiser, so don't breath on anything that can rust Smile


It will also contain 'an amount' of airway lining fluid, but I tend not to think about that when rubbing it around my filters, as it seems as good a remedy as anything else. Filters are a particular pain to clean in my estimation, and my finger ends seem attracted to the glass no matter what. I can leave smudges and be convinced I've never touched the damn thing.


PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
Filters are a particular pain to clean in my estimation, and my finger ends seem attracted to the glass no matter what. I can leave smudges and be convinced I've never touched the damn thing.


My thoughts exactly! Laugh 1