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Film through hand luggage check
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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 3:11 pm    Post subject: Film through hand luggage check Reply with quote

Hi all,

I just wanted to ask you on how to store properly my films
a. when they are new
b. when they go through the x-rays at hand luggage check at the airport
c. after they are shot and before development
d. after they are burned on fire?

Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For any modern airport there is no problem in hand luggage, it's the check in luggage in the hold that could cause problems...dunno about 3rd world countries in some parts of the world though.


PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi thanks for the answer. I will be travelling inside Europe so I guess I would be fine.
Is not film affected by the x-rays though?

Alex


PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
Hi thanks for the answer. I will be travelling inside Europe so I guess I would be fine.
Is not film affected by the x-rays though?

Alex


Yes it is affected but IIRC you would have to travel about 18 times through a hand luggage scan before the same film might be damaged because of accumulated x-rays....that is for slow film, far fast film it could be about 10 times.


PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find that burning film on a fire can have an adverse effect on the end results, giving poor resolution and weird colour casts, but I have never bothered storing it anywhere. Wink


PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 4:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have seen my film on an x-ray in the airport you can see through the cartridge and see the film rolled up and the sprockets overlapping quite clearly. You can also see in a camera how much film is wound onto the take up spool.

There were no ill effects what so ever. Remarkably. In the 70's you could buy a tin-foil lined bag to take films thru the airport but most of the magazines who tested them said they were un necessary.

Re storing films.

Mine live in a drawer in the bottom of my wardrobe along with a few bags of silica gel. I dont keep them long enough for them to go off. If you have a large supply of specialist films, fridge or freezer is good but not absolutely necessary. Films are subject to fungus like camera lenses so cool, dry and consistant temperature is best for normal use.

Whether the film is used or not makes no difference.


PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 4:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a dedicated fridge for my film, my mum bought a new fridge but there was nothing wrong with the old one so I nabbed it and it's now in my garage stuffed to bursting with film Smile


PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ian has a fridge full of ancient and/or exotic films in weird sizes for his experiments. This is what I meant as specialist films. If you are buying small batches of normal 35mm as you need them there is no necessity to go to a lot of trouble.

A Tupperware container in your kitchen fridge would be fine. The film must be allowed to get to room temperature for a few hours before using to avoid condensation.