Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Film rated 50 sharper than film 100@50?
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 7:57 pm    Post subject: Film rated 50 sharper than film 100@50? Reply with quote

Hello

I am finally getting chance to shoot more film. For 35mm I normally shoot T-Max 100 or Portra 160. Last night I discovered Velvia 50 and then Ilford Pan F 50. I was blown away by the sharpness so wanted to ask the potentially dumb question of if I rate 100 speed film at 50 when shooting it would I get the apparent fine grain sharpness seen in film rated with a box speed of 50?

I am guessing no but was interested to check!

Thanks

Here is a sample of T-Max 100 using a Voigtlander Bessa R3A

Voigtlander Bessa R3A by MrLeica.com (MatthewOsbornePhotography), on Flickr


PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matthew,

Yes and no.

Yes because a film rated slower requires less devel. time, comparing to normal grain size - more development time bigger the grain.
No because in the same brand in general a slower film has the grain smaller than the faster.
And finally maybe, it depends of the developer you're using for both films - as you can see I can give u general results because it's a complex answer, and depends on many factors,

HTH,

Renato


PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RSalles wrote:
Matthew,

Yes and no.

Yes because a film rated slower requires less devel. time, comparing to normal grain size - more development time bigger the grain.
No because in the same brand in general a slower film has the grain smaller than the faster.
And finally maybe, it depends of the developer you're using for both films - as you can see I can give u general results because it's a complex answer, and depends on many factors,

HTH,

Renato


Thanks Renato,

The main reason I ask is I get spoilt by medium format film so then often find 35mm film a little grainy. This can of course be good but I want to capture the maximum detail also. I normally use Rodinal stand developing for my B&W film.

I guess to broaden my answer, when shooting digital cameras like my M9 I can use soft focus (less sharp / older lenses) like a Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 and still get sharp results wide open (by sharpening in PP). As a contrast if I use the 'clinically' sharp modern Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 lens on my Leica M2 and shoot wide open the photos look grain and not as sharp as I would like. This then lead me to thinking about 50 speed film.

Thanks


PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matthew,

In this case I think a really slower than ISO 100 film - 64, 32, 25 developed in another developer like Microphen, HC-110 or X-tol will give you better results than Rodinal. I'm not using right now 35mm but only 120 and 4x5 B&W film, but had used 35mm for decades. I remember have used Agfa and Ilford low ISO for B&W with Microphen and had very consistent results and fine grain too.
Try Ilford Pan-F Plus with Microphen 1:1 for instance, I'm sure you'll like it.
I have been using in these last months Rodinal in dilutions from 1:25 to 1:300 with normal, semi and stand mainly because I wanted that "rough" look for landscape photography and searching for the luminescent effect from stand dev.

Cheers,

Renato


PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RSalles wrote:
Matthew,

In this case I think a really slower than ISO 100 film - 64, 32, 25 developed in another developer like Microphen, HC-110 or X-tol will give you better results than Rodinal. I'm not using right now 35mm but only 120 and 4x5 B&W film, but had used 35mm for decades. I remember have used Agfa and Ilford low ISO for B&W with Microphen and had very consistent results and fine grain too.
Try Ilford Pan-F Plus with Microphen 1:1 for instance, I'm sure you'll like it.
I have been using in these last months Rodinal in dilutions from 1:25 to 1:300 with normal, semi and stand mainly because I wanted that "rough" look for landscape photography and searching for the luminescent effect from stand dev.

Cheers,

Renato


Thanks Renato, I will look into this.

I have used mostly Rodinal 1:150 to date and do like the results I get with 35mm. It may be this rough look you talk of but for me this is all I know. I like it as easy to develop and very cheap and nearly always gives results regardless of what camera setting you used.

See here for examples (there are some that are not film so just look at the B&W ones). All with Rodinal + T-Max 100 35mm

https://www.flickr.com/search/?text=voigtlander%20bessa%20r3a&sort=relevance&user_id=32681588%40N03