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Film help/advice for a youngtimer
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2016 10:05 am    Post subject: Film help/advice for a youngtimer Reply with quote

Hey guys,

After discovering the beautifull world of old manual lenses, which I very much enjoy on my digital camera's, I am now looking to do some more film photography. I didn't totally miss out on the film era, but as a kid I only did some insta film and such. And I have little to no knowledge of film. Got myself a minolta 7000i (no manual lens, but shhh) and a praktica mtl 5b for my m42 lenses.

Had some 4 year expired kodak color plus 200 film with the minolta, weren't stored cool, not even close. yet I got some pretty decent shots out of it. And had some kodak gold 200's tried 2 rolls, not a massive fan so far, but 1 was messed up by the developer.

So my big question is what would you advice for me to use on holiday (Analog stuff is comming as an extra in adition to the digital stuff) so some landscape stuff, few portraits.

I can currently get my hands on, Kodak gold, Agfaphoto vista 200/400, Kodak ektar, fuji color c200, fuji superia 200/400. And most of the ilfor b/w range. I also already got a b/w fuji roll.


PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2016 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
Kodak gold and Ektar give a bit more vivid colours, and a good general purpose film is Fuji superia 200, and Agfa Vista (the latest from UK Poundland store) is very good on the right subjects but shows a bit more grain as it's really Fuji C200, some guys have pushed it to 1600 ISO with reasonable results.....also converts well to B\W in Photoshop...so for £1 it's worth playing with.
Forgot...if you have the Poundland Agfa Vista 400 ISO it is reckoned to be Fuji Superia 400 which is said to be better than Fuji superia 200 ISO as it's more modern.
happy shooting


PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2016 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you very much for clearing that up.

I went with some cheap Kodak Gold as I like it so far, not extremely good, sharp, small grain or so, but it's good enough.
A role of Ektar for some landscape work and 2 rolls of kodak tri-x 400 b/w for some small village work, should turn out nicely, I hope.


PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2016 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

redguy22 wrote:
Thank you very much for clearing that up.

I went with some cheap Kodak Gold as I like it so far, not extremely good, sharp, small grain or so, but it's good enough.
A role of Ektar for some landscape work and 2 rolls of kodak tri-x 400 b/w for some small village work, should turn out nicely, I hope.


What is great about film is it's forgiving in that most films you can go 4-5 stops over exposure and -2 under and still get very good results and less problem with highlights that annoy the digi guys...but they say Ektar (which I haven't used yet) is a bit temperamental on exposure i.e. different results for over and under exposure....but as said, haven't use it yet so don't know if true...so look forward to what you think after using it.


PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've read that the kodak tri-x should be very, very forgiving'. Thanks about the tip for the Etars, my praktica still has a working lightmeter, but I'll try to be a bit more carefull. I will report back here to show you the results.

I really, really love film, digital has it usefullness, but film has character. Even my better half has no problem with it, she shot a roll herself. Going to load the fridge full of film. Laugh 1


PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2016 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

redguy22 wrote:
I've read that the kodak tri-x should be very, very forgiving'. Thanks about the tip for the Etars, my praktica still has a working lightmeter, but I'll try to be a bit more carefull. I will report back here to show you the results.

I really, really love film, digital has it usefullness, but film has character. Even my better half has no problem with it, she shot a roll herself. Going to load the fridge full of film. Laugh 1


My son bought my wife a digi compact for her birthday, and after a while she said "my film compact was so simple and easy to use" LOL


PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2016 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks like you have some good emulsions at your disposal. So you should get good results. I would encourage you to develop your B&W film yourself -- it's very easy, but you will have to get some necessary items, like a developing tank and a good thermometer. Developing C-41 or E-6 is not difficult, but it does require that you're able to maintain a precise temperature during development, which can get tricky. But if you don't want to mess with developing, I'd send the exposed films to Dwayne's, which is probably the best, most consistent photo lab in the USA. Unless you have a local pro lab you prefer, of course.

I think it's also worth mentioning, at least, a couple of other film choices -- which are easily available via mail order: Kodak Portra, either 160 or 400 (C-41), and Fuji Provia slide film (E-6). I prefer Portra over Ektar -- it has more neutral colors, I feel, and excellent saturation, yet still has vanishingly small grain. And Provia, one of the last remaining slide emulsions, is also excellent -- one of the best slide emulsions ever. Available either in ISO 100 or 400.


PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2016 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sun and nature, try Velvia (real Velvia =Velvia50) or Sensia100 (which unfortunately, is not made any longer) if you can get E6 developed.

Slide must be exposed quite on the point however.

Dont use Velvia on people, it is just too red. Astia or Provia I suppose.


PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Astia isn't made any longer either, unfortunately. And I think that Provia 400 has also been discontinued. It's just Provia 100 and Velvia 50 and 100 anymore.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2016 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the velvia and such are slide film, or am I mixing up some things?

Just a small report back, I loaded 1 film of kodak gold, had some massive rewind issue with my Praktica, so that wasn't a great succes, I lost about 6 photos, but the rest turned out pretty nice.
Loaded 1 roll of kodak t max 400 b/w there the trouble started. My CZJ 35mm f2.4 broke down, aperture is stuck. I didn't notice it untill I shot about 15 photos, at first I thought the lightmeter was wonky, turned out to be the lens. Rest of the roll should be ok, but I am now looking for a half decent photolab to see what can be salvaged from that film. I had no other m42 lens with me other than the CZJ 135mm so I didn't shoot any more rolls.

(But I will get the 35mm repaired, and I bought a Canon eos 5 for some more analog stuff and to use mij Zeiss 28mm with)


PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bought it all second hand (not "used") anyway. Though it will be difficult to source Sensia100 now.

Anyone needs cinnamon Fuji RD100?

Yes, Velvia etc. are E6 slide.