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Daily Mail Architectural Photos from Massimo Listri
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 6:41 am    Post subject: Daily Mail Architectural Photos from Massimo Listri Reply with quote

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2212945/Inside-magnificent-spaces-Europes-grandiose-palaces.html

Holy cow are those incredible. I'd like to know what his technique was and his gear list.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shurely tripod mount, tilt/shift lens .
Thank you for sharing . Perfect shots , magnificent architecture . To remark the perfect composition of the frames. WoW !


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yinyangbt wrote:

Thank you for sharing . Perfect shots , magnificent architecture . To remark the perfect composition .of the frames. WoW !

+1

I can't guess the anything on the setup, though.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They look like phorensic photos to me. I mean, they're devoided of any personality. They're all taken from the same standard central point.
He photographs every building in the same way, no matter whether it's a church or a museum or a library.
Sure, he accomplishes the technical work well. But everyone with a tripod, a good camera, a good lens and a bubble level can.
You just have to measure the room and place your tripod in the exact middle.
You don't even have to have a shift lens, you can do the straightening with Photoshop.
In some photos, HDR was abused and led to innatural results. Some of the photos are devoided of any shadows.
The third, fourth, and sixth photos are terrible in this respect, but there are other bad looking ones that I don't count.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
They look like phorensic photos to me. I mean, they're devoided of any personality.


I like them for this reason, actually.
And I agree that in some cases HDR was abused.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aanything wrote:

I like them for this reason, actually.


My opinion is that every building has a different character, just like a person, and that a photographer should try to
capture that particular character in the photograph.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio is right , they are very TECHNICAL .This is that "something"in these shots. This is what I liked , I saw a lot of crap architecture shots (including mines Smile),that these poped out for me. .
Agree about the third ,fourth and the sixth pics and overdone HDR
And the term used by you , Orio, is very good , it slipped to me ,but it's really "surgical" .Very precise , cold . No inventions , no phantasy.
I'd love to see shots of these places in a different manner , as Orio suggests ,in a more "artistic" approach .


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The shots certainly achieve their purpose: To show the stunning interiors of these altars to wealth, but they are very clinical and cold.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clinical yes, but also very appealing. A surprising number of architectural photographers don't seem able to get some of the basics -- parallel lines, for instance -- in their shots.

THe rest of his work that I saw on his website is also pretty clinical, but still fabulous.


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Aanything wrote:

I like them for this reason, actually.


My opinion is that every building has a different character, just like a person, and that a photographer should try to
capture that particular character in the photograph.


I agree on this as well.
It's true, there can be better ways to shoot these interiors, with a more adequate approach, but I find the extreme "coldness" of these appealing under certain aspect.
I wouldn't use these as an example of artistic photography, but I like them.


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
A surprising number of architectural photographers don't seem able to get some of the basics -- parallel lines, for instance -- in their shots.


I agree with you ; but that shouldn't happen with proffessionals (and ,in fact , it doesn't ) .I think those bad examples are snapshots that come from amateur photographers .