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Close focusing wide angles
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I popped on the forum to search an old thread but this thread is timely. I have been playing with a Soligor 28mm f/2.0 P lens I picked up for <$50. They seem to be rare to find, but a nice little lens. I can focus as close as about 5" from the tip of the lens. I haven't calculated any reproduction values so I can't say 'how macro' it is. Either way, I've been really loving what this lens pumps out. I'm also seeking out these other Soligor "P" lenses (marked with a red 'P' on them. Haven't search the forum for this topic yet either as it's likely been discussed. I believe this lens was Tokina-made. Anyway, should you come across one for a fair price, consider checking it out! Lovely central sharpness and a lot of character in the out-of-focus rendering, separating the subject from the background pretty well.


@f/2.0


@f/2.0



PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have one of these Soligor Red P 28 / 2 lenses, I've had it for years.....and it frustrates the hell out of me. I've had some of my best pictures from this lens, and some of the worst. And the hit rate seems low, so I don't use it. But I won't get rid of it because on a good day it's wonderful. Or more likely it's me having a bad day? Rolling Eyes

This was taken on my Sony A6000, no idea what settings.


Ilford XP2, with the Soligor on a Minolta XD7


And it works OK in close focus.


I shall have to get this lens out again, it's too good to get rid of.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know, my experience is similar. I haven't had it long enough to say best and worst, but it does strike me as something of a "moody" lens, if not merely extremely situational. At times, I have picked it up and made some ethereal images that are the stuff of why I still love manual focus glass. And then, just as you say, I will pick it up another time, walk around with it, and feel like it's completely missing how I am seeing the world - I wonder if my copy is de-centered actually because of how erratic the sharpness can be across the frame. But again, when it's on....it's ON!


PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've used the Sigma 24mm 2.8 super wide, Nikkor 28mm f2, Nikkor 28mm 2.8 AIS, Ensinor 24mm 2.8, Komine 28mm f/2 cf, Komine 28mm 2.8cf. I like the Sigma most of all, but all the rest do the job. The Cosina 24mm 2.8 (made 1 for Vivitar too) is very good up close. jt


PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could I step back a notch and ask why one would like a close focusing wide angle lens when a standard wide angle such as the Tokina 28/2.8 will focus down to 0.3m anyway ?
Not trying to be facetious, just trying to improve my understanding.
Cheers,

edit:
It seems to me that if you are focusing closer than about 0.3m (from the film plane) then you are going to cast shadows on the subject and/or risk frightening the subject away (if it's alive).
I can understand the increased depth of field of the wide angle lens could be advantageous.
Is there something else ?


PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FWIW ... The Flektogon 35mm f2.4 can focus at 18 cm ... without a problem.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 2:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

3dpan wrote:
Could I step back a notch and ask why one would like a close focusing wide angle lens when a standard wide angle such as the Tokina 28/2.8 will focus down to 0.3m anyway ?
Not trying to be facetious, just trying to improve my understanding.
Cheers,

edit:
It seems to me that if you are focusing closer than about 0.3m (from the film plane) then you are going to cast shadows on the subject and/or risk frightening the subject away (if it's alive).
I can understand the increased depth of field of the wide angle lens could be advantageous.
Is there something else ?


I find there are times I want to get down "into" a subject, create an image that makes you feel like you're enveloped in the subject, like the inside of a flower. Where a normal or telephoto macro is going to give you working distance, it also forces you to work back and can inevitably flatten the perspective a bit. Whereas a close-focusing wide allows you to get down into the subject, but maintain a wider field of view. I find I like these lenses for textures. Getting down close to a surface or subject like moss and a mushroom on a log, while still giving some sense of place (seeing the surrounding forest, etc). Or a found object on a gritty street. Special case, but the results can be really nice.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

justtorchit wrote:
3dpan wrote:
Could I step back a notch and ask why one would like a close focusing wide angle lens when a standard wide angle such as the Tokina 28/2.8 will focus down to 0.3m anyway ?
Not trying to be facetious, just trying to improve my understanding.
Cheers,

edit:
It seems to me that if you are focusing closer than about 0.3m (from the film plane) then you are going to cast shadows on the subject and/or risk frightening the subject away (if it's alive).
I can understand the increased depth of field of the wide angle lens could be advantageous.
Is there something else ?


I find there are times I want to get down "into" a subject, create an image that makes you feel like you're enveloped in the subject, like the inside of a flower. Where a normal or telephoto macro is going to give you working distance, it also forces you to work back and can inevitably flatten the perspective a bit. Whereas a close-focusing wide allows you to get down into the subject, but maintain a wider field of view. I find I like these lenses for textures. Getting down close to a surface or subject like moss and a mushroom on a log, while still giving some sense of place (seeing the surrounding forest, etc). Or a found object on a gritty street. Special case, but the results can be really nice.


Agreed! jt


PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

calvin83 wrote:
venus optics laowa 15mm f4, 1:1 marco. Wink


I use a copy of this, an Opteka 15mm/4 macro. Optical Quality is OK, but build quality is bad. The E-Mount adapter I got with the lens even had all screws loose!

I tried different wideangle macro ways:
- Special lenses like the Opteka 15mm/4, Novoflex 35, Sigma 24...
- Extension tubes, like the short M42 distance rings and tubes. And I even made short extension tubes for Canon EF / EOS and Sony E-Mount: http://www.4photos.de/camera-diy/Duenner-Canon-Zwischenring.html
Normal 12 mm tubes are often much too long for wideangel lenses, so I made 8 and 6mm thin ones.
- Relais lens setups, containing for example a CCTV C-Mount wideangle lens for 2/3" sensors, and a relais lens to pick up the inter-image:
http://www.4photos.de/camera-diy/objektiv-format-adaption.html
- Borescops - they very often have wideangle lenses. But picture quality is bad with the cheaper ones.
- Small image sensors wideangle lenses - for example as part of industrial flexible endoscopes with camera head at the front of the endoscope.