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Canon FD camera's
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 2:15 pm    Post subject: Canon FD camera's Reply with quote

Is it me being a bit of a tight a..e, but having just gone onto the UK evil bay I now find that FD cameras you could barely give away not that long ago are now selling for over £100 by the vendor and in some cases considerable more. How about a T50 with 1.8 lens and 4 films for a hundred quid?
Its not as if these cameras including the A1, Ae1 etc etc are particulary rare is it?


PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, what they ask for and what they get at the end of the day are two different things.

Having said that, I recently found a Canon FTbN body on eBay in near mint condition for 47.


PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I been wondering the same thing. Most reasonably priced FD bodies are in Japan.


PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well there wasn't billions of very good film cameras made so eventually in the future they will be more scarce esp electronic ones as if they stop working they are usually thrown away as no one wants to (or can't) repair them.


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excalibur wrote:
Well there wasn't billions of very good film cameras made so eventually in the future they will be more scarce esp electronic ones as if they stop working they are usually thrown away as no one wants to (or can't) repair them.


says someone who has 25 film cameras in his signature

Friends


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indeed i've seen some FD cameras go for over 100 euros on Catawiki as well. Is there some kind of hype going on that we're missing here?


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskalaCafe wrote:
Excalibur wrote:
Well there wasn't billions of very good film cameras made so eventually in the future they will be more scarce esp electronic ones as if they stop working they are usually thrown away as no one wants to (or can't) repair them.


says someone who has 25 film cameras in his signature

Friends


LOL Well I've had 57 years to collect them, but 98% of my 35mm cameras were bought cheap when no one wanted them, and occasionally pickup up the odd one at boot sales e.g. last one was Minolta XD-11 with 50mm f1.4 lens for 15...but decent cameras are even becoming scarce at boot sales Sad
The Canon FTB mentioned, I got one 9 years ago with 28mm, 50mm and 135mm for 10..but the FTB needed a service and eventually broke it forcing the wind on lever (which was very stiff) Sad


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like Excalibur, I was fortunate enough to buy my FD gear back when nobody wanted it. I have just about all I want, much less need. The only possible exception -- I'd still like to find a minty black FTb. I have a decent black one, but it is quite a ways away from being mint.

I've noticed this uptick trend toward classic 35mm cameras in general also. As a buyer and seller of gear on eBay I have mixed feelings, As a buyer, I'll likely be paying more, but as a seller, I'll be making more. Problem as a seller, though, is finding them cheap, which is becoming harder to do.

Right now I have only two cameras I'll be listing on eBay soon: a very nice Pentax Spotmattic II and a fairly clean black Nikon FE2. I've listed the Pentax before, but there was no interest. Maybe that's beginning to change now. The FE2, I'm quite confident will sell fairly quickly. But after those two are gone, prospects don't look good at finding more to sell with the hopes of making even a paltry profit.

AF 35mm Cameras -- just about all of them that aren't pro quality, sell for almost nothing, so they're not even worth messing with. That may change, though. The early EOS cameras were built well, made out of metal and meant to last a while. I own an Elan IIe that was made in the late '90s and it has quite a bit of plastic in its construction, but it has been reliable -- going on 20 years old now. I'm not acquainted with other makes, so I can't really speak to them and their quality.

You know what I find a little odd about this uptick in "classic" camera prices? It isn't just the mechanical cameras that have experienced this. Electronic cameras, such as the A-series Canons, the Nikon FE/FE2/FG/etc., and others have also experienced price increases. So, I can't sit here and say that people are buying the mechanical ones because they think they're gonna last. No, I think at least part of what's going on is people see that many of these battery-dependent cameras have stood the test of time well and are also worth consideration. At least that's the way I'm trying to analyze things.


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe the reason is a lot simpler than we think. There has been a resurgence in the demand for film in recent years; Kodak, for example, are reintroducing Ektachrome later this year. I think young photographers who have known nothing but digital capture and older photographers who once again yearn for the hands on experience and results that film provides are partly the reason for the upsurge in demand for analogue cameras.


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DigiChromeEd wrote:
Maybe the reason is a lot simpler than we think. There has been a resurgence in the demand for film in recent years; Kodak, for example, are reintroducing Ektachrome later this year. I think young photographers who have known nothing but digital capture and older photographers who once again yearn for the hands on experience and results that film provides are partly the reason for the upsurge in demand for analogue cameras.


That could be true of course! And a digital Canon shooter might just want the film versions as well. Wink


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DigiChromeEd wrote:
Maybe the reason is a lot simpler than we think. There has been a resurgence in the demand for film in recent years;...


I was just about to comment similarly. Will it last? Who knows. I'm currently reeling from the number of photographers taking up wet plate.


PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DigiChromeEd wrote:
Maybe the reason is a lot simpler than we think. There has been a resurgence in the demand for film in recent years; Kodak, for example, are reintroducing Ektachrome later this year. I think young photographers who have known nothing but digital capture and older photographers who once again yearn for the hands on experience and results that film provides are partly the reason for the upsurge in demand for analogue cameras.


....and Fuji are going in the opposite direction in that they have discontinued making Superia 200 now.


PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excalibur wrote:
DigiChromeEd wrote:
Maybe the reason is a lot simpler than we think. There has been a resurgence in the demand for film in recent years; Kodak, for example, are reintroducing Ektachrome later this year. I think young photographers who have known nothing but digital capture and older photographers who once again yearn for the hands on experience and results that film provides are partly the reason for the upsurge in demand for analogue cameras.


....and Fuji are going in the opposite direction in that they have discontinued making Superia 200 now.


Although Rollei has just announced a new slide film:
https://www.lomography.com/magazine/331164-vario-chrome-by-rollei-the-new-slide-film-available-this-early-july
A quote from this reference above:
That brings the count to four new, reformulated or resurrected film stocks that will become available this year. The others include: Kodak Ektachrome, Ferrania P30 b/w film, and a reformulation of LomoChrome Purple 400 film. Not to mention Lomography also announced three new single-use cameras and German film maker ADOX announced it will doubled the size of its film plant. All this means more options for analog diehards.
OH


PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I always think if all (well quite a few) digi camera owners around the world just used a film camera now and again it was certainly help the film industry...but then if say 50,000 (or whatever) digi owners did this, would there be enough old film cameras still working perfectly around to meet the demand..h'mm
It would be interesting to know how many good film cameras were made from say 1960 to 1990 probably plenty of compacts...I've tried to find out the production run for a few makes\models of slrs but not getting anywhere.


PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure that, with SLRs alone, dated from 1960 to when they were finally discontinued in favor of digital (except a couple of die-hards like the Nikon F6), you can extend the time frame up to about 2007 or so. So that's about 47 years of SLR production. And my guess would be that many, many millions of SLRs were produced during this time frame. I wouldn't be surprised if the number was in the hundreds of millions.

So I'm thinking it will be quite some time before film SLRs will become scarce.

If we were to restrict this count to mechanical SLRs only, well, the number will shrink dramatically, but still there are lots of them out there and many are so well made that they will probably be working properly after being in regular use for 100 years.


PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
I'm sure that, with SLRs alone, dated from 1960 to when they were finally discontinued in favor of digital (except a couple of die-hards like the Nikon F6), you can extend the time frame up to about 2007 or so. So that's about 47 years of SLR production. And my guess would be that many, many millions of SLRs were produced during this time frame. I wouldn't be surprised if the number was in the hundreds of millions.

So I'm thinking it will be quite some time before film SLRs will become scarce.

If we were to restrict this count to mechanical SLRs only, well, the number will shrink dramatically, but still there are lots of them out there and many are so well made that they will probably be working properly after being in regular use for 100 years.


Interesting and we'll never know how many say SLRs are still in boxes in garages and lofts etc, and how many were lost or thrown away broken Wink..there is one Canon AE1 missing as my father dropped it into the sea. Sad


PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I've had a stall at a local Antique & Collectors Fair I've sold Practika's all day long, admittedly I sell them cheap just to shift the damn things, but it's what people pick up first and what they choose to buy. I've really struggled to sell good SLR's such as Canon A1 and AE1P, Minolta 5000i and 7000i, Olympus OM's etc and people just don't look at them. At the last fair I sold about six or seven Practika and Zenit for about 15 each with lens. and one Minolta 7000, with three lenses, and a bag with all the accessories and booklets, in mint condition, for just 40....and that was a hard sale.

But the best seller I've had has been the Chinon CE4 and CE5, at previous fairs they've flown off the table for 50 with a lens. People who want a good camera to USE love them. And I can see why, they are really solid workhorse cameras.


PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lloydy wrote:
When I've had a stall at a local Antique & Collectors Fair I've sold Practika's all day long, admittedly I sell them cheap just to shift the damn things, but it's what people pick up first and what they choose to buy. I've really struggled to sell good SLR's such as Canon A1 and AE1P, Minolta 5000i and 7000i, Olympus OM's etc and people just don't look at them. At the last fair I sold about six or seven Practika and Zenit for about 15 each with lens. and one Minolta 7000, with three lenses, and a bag with all the accessories and booklets, in mint condition, for just 40....and that was a hard sale.

But the best seller I've had has been the Chinon CE4 and CE5, at previous fairs they've flown off the table for 50 with a lens. People who want a good camera to USE love them. And I can see why, they are really solid workhorse cameras.


The M42 Chinon CEs were quite advanced with option of auto, 1/2000 sec and memory hold. My CE is all metal, is heavy and built like a tank..the most annoying thing for me is you have to wind the film\shutter on to take an exposure reading Sad


PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I got back into film photography about 18 months ago by purchasing a Canon A-1 (I had one in 1979), I've sold seven Canon AE-1s or AE-Ps. In Sweden the difference between the AE-1 and Program doesn't seem to matter much. Often the AE-1 Program is sold as AE-1. The average selling price with a Canon FD 50mm/1.8 has been around $130. That's what I got for an AE-1 last month--and the buyer is very happy. I've sold three A-1s and they have only brought about $15 more. Sometimes I've thrown in a bonus flash or zoom lens. Obviously it wouldn't be worthwhile to sell them if I couldn't find them at low prices occasionally--usually in need of a battery, cleaning, new seals and with a tendency to sneeze.



PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know it's just me, but I wouldn't pay that kind of cash for an old Canon film camera. I have been lucky and collected a horde of Nikon gear over the years, I also collected just about all of the Fujinon 35mm film cameras, so I'm set on good film camera's. I only buy a 35mm film camera when I see a good deal these days, other than that, forget about it.

It does seem like the film market has gained a bit of traction as of late, but i highly doubt it will be sustainable.


PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiralcity wrote:

It does seem like the film market has gained a bit of traction as of late, but i highly doubt it will be sustainable.


People said the same thing about LPs back in the 1980s. Yet they refuse to die. By 1990 I wasn't even sure I'd be able to replace my turntable if I ever needed to. Not a problem though.

Analog technology, in general, I've found to be highly resistant to obsolescence. There's just something about it that people prefer. For example, I'm a guitarist and an artist. As a guitarist, I can tell you absolutely that the most prized amplifiers are those that are 100% analog tube-type amps. They have a warmth that amplifier manufacturers have spent millions in R&D trying to duplicate digitally. Yet they survive and thrive. As an artist, I see the astounding works people are creating using Photoshop and other similar tools. But I'll take a canvas and a set of oils and brushes any day over this stuff. And which will still be around in 100 years? Same goes for film vs. digital.

I like old cars and old motorcycles, with their analog gauges. One of my pet peeves is digital gauges in cars or on motorcycles. I hate 'em. It's impossible to quantify the rate of change (ie, acceleration) with a digital readout (unless it is mimicking an analog one), whereas it is easy to do so with an analog gauge. Even the radios you find in cars these days. They're all digital with preset values where they "think" a station would be. In my previous life as a camera dealer, I used to do a lot of traveling, much of which was done in an old Honda Civic. That car had a radio with an analog dial. When you're out on the road in the middle of the night with nothing better to do than listen to the radio, often in order to tune in a distant station, it required tiny adjustments to the dial to tune in those distant stations. With the modern radio in my Volvo, this sort of tunability doesn't exist.

Long live analog in all its forms.

Back to the topic of Canon FD cameras, though, frankly I continue to be amazed at how robust Canon's electronic FD cameras are. If, when I bought my Canon A-1 back in 1983, you'd have told me that it would still be working perfectly 35 years later, I'd have looked closely at the cigarette you were smoking, or checking to see if your eyes were dilated. I'd have even been somewhat doubtful of the longevity of my mechanical Canons -- FTbs and F-1s -- back then. And it isn't just Canon, it is the camera industry in general that did a great job of putting together photographic tools that have survived well beyond what most anyone would have anticipated.


PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
spiralcity wrote:

It does seem like the film market has gained a bit of traction as of late, but i highly doubt it will be sustainable.


People said the same thing about LPs back in the 1980s. Yet they refuse to die. By 1990 I wasn't even sure I'd be able to replace my turntable if I ever needed to. Not a problem though.

Analog technology, in general, I've found to be highly resistant to obsolescence. There's just something about it that people prefer. For example, I'm a guitarist and an artist. As a guitarist, I can tell you absolutely that the most prized amplifiers are those that are 100% analog tube-type amps. They have a warmth that amplifier manufacturers have spent millions in R&D trying to duplicate digitally. Yet they survive and thrive. As an artist, I see the astounding works people are creating using Photoshop and other similar tools. But I'll take a canvas and a set of oils and brushes any day over this stuff. And which will still be around in 100 years? Same goes for film vs. digital.

I like old cars and old motorcycles, with their analog gauges. One of my pet peeves is digital gauges in cars or on motorcycles. I hate 'em. It's impossible to quantify the rate of change (ie, acceleration) with a digital readout (unless it is mimicking an analog one), whereas it is easy to do so with an analog gauge. Even the radios you find in cars these days. They're all digital with preset values where they "think" a station would be. In my previous life as a camera dealer, I used to do a lot of traveling, much of which was done in an old Honda Civic. That car had a radio with an analog dial. When you're out on the road in the middle of the night with nothing better to do than listen to the radio, often in order to tune in a distant station, it required tiny adjustments to the dial to tune in those distant stations. With the modern radio in my Volvo, this sort of tunability doesn't exist.

Long live analog in all its forms.

Back to the topic of Canon FD cameras, though, frankly I continue to be amazed at how robust Canon's electronic FD cameras are. If, when I bought my Canon A-1 back in 1983, you'd have told me that it would still be working perfectly 35 years later, I'd have looked closely at the cigarette you were smoking, or checking to see if your eyes were dilated. I'd have even been somewhat doubtful of the longevity of my mechanical Canons -- FTbs and F-1s -- back then. And it isn't just Canon, it is the camera industry in general that did a great job of putting together photographic tools that have survived well beyond what most anyone would have anticipated.


I never said it would die, but I do expect a shift in the market as far as value on many of these old film camera's.