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Best Abstracts Contest
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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mo wrote:
@Michael .....A little ETish... Laughing

Cool


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mo wrote:

Kuuan another pearl...I assume they are metal balustrades although they look glass like in your photo?I think they are perfectly abstract in their appearance. Very Happy


correct Mo, it is a metal balustrade of a stairway, and there was renovation going on, the floor down had been opened for putting new drainage pipes and I thought, even though not discernible, that this may give an additional edge

great the contrapositioning of the age rings of the wood with the lines separating the pages of the book in yours!!

can you make out what this is?
I think people knowledgeable of machinery will know


( S-M-C 1.4/50 on Pentax K-x )


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Part of a turbine's inner compressor stage? I really have no idea, but I like the geometry.


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Part of a turbine's inner compressor stage? I really have no idea, but I like the geometry.


turbine's inner compressor stage..WOW Michael, that must describe it better than I had known to!
eh..but what kind of turbine would it be? Laughing



PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Fuji X100 (Black and White Mode)
Pretty easy to guess what this is. Smile


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurence wrote:

Pretty easy to guess what this is. Smile


not that easy Laurance
is it 'dirty, oily' water?

the turbine is of a wreckage of an American fighter jet, seen at an 'airforce museum' in Hanoi, spot it below the US airforce symbol:



PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kuaan wrote:
not that easy Laurance
is it 'dirty, oily' water?


You are partly correct. It is ocean foam, swirling around rocks, and then
when the foam comes together, it creates swirls while merging with other
areas of foam.

The swirling motion picks up grains of sand, and those grains coalesce
into the shape of the foam swirl. It's a sort of "mandelbrot" of nature.

Not exactly beautiful, but still somewhat abstractual. Smile

Regarding the wreckage of the jet, that is a very SHARP image. It always
gives me a bit of melancholy to see all the wasted metal products that
go into the "war machines". The total costs of all the wars must be a
staggering sum, and a staggering impact on our Earth's ecosystem.


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurence wrote:
kuaan wrote:
not that easy Laurance
is it 'dirty, oily' water?


You are partly correct. It is ocean foam, swirling around rocks, and then
when the foam comes together, it creates swirls while merging with other
areas of foam.

The swirling motion picks up grains of sand, and those grains coalesce
into the shape of the foam swirl. It's a sort of "mandelbrot" of nature.

Not exactly beautiful, but still somewhat abstractual. Smile



mandelbrot of nature..nice..
have seen it, something similar just today at a shore of a lake, but never knew that in the ocean the swirl picks up sand and that makes it look very special! beautiful image Laurance, celebration of nature, much a better theme than my pics' here

Laurence wrote:
Regarding the wreckage of the jet, that is a very SHARP image. It always
gives me a bit of melancholy to see all the wasted metal products that
go into the "war machines". The total costs of all the wars must be a
staggering sum, and a staggering impact on our Earth's ecosystem.


sharp..that's the S-M-C 1.4/50 stopped down

I was thinking the same, when I read the bragging notes in the museum of how many 1000 planes had been shot down..
but the 'cost', the impact on human lives is so much greater, and I am afraid some wars are fought just to aid the military industry
just imagine all these resources being used 'properly'!

another 'piece' hanging off a wing of a still intact, but a bit rusty warplane


(S-M-C 1.4/50 on K-x wide open )


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like a gatling, right?


PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2011 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Himself wrote:
Looks like a gatling, right?


No, that's a multi-missile pod. Simple "dumb" missiles that were used in "point and shoot" situations.

Like it or don't, throughout history -- go back as far as you want, it don't matter -- many important items of progress have come out of such conflicts. From the furnaces of war, often there are produced items of inestimable value. So there is a certain "beating swords into plowshares" truth about military conflict.

We take the Internet for granted. It was originally a DARPA project, designed specifically so that it would be able to resist efforts to bring down the network. It's done pretty well in that respect, despite all the hacking attempts, hasn't it. DARPA stands for the United States Defense Advance Research Projects Agency.

Many of us now take GPS for granted, another US Defense Department project -- that's now being shared with civilian populations globally.

I could go on, but you get the picture.

Glad (and sad) to see I was right about guessing that the item was a turbine component (that's all jet engines are, are turbines with a bit of fuel added to them). Here in the US, we would have long since recycled that mountain of scrap.


PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

that's a stunning image Klaus, very 70s Wink

cooltouch wrote:

No, that's a multi-missile pod. Simple "dumb" missiles that were used in "point and shoot" situations.


right:



cooltouch wrote:

Like it or don't, throughout history -- go back as far as you want, it don't matter -- many important items of progress have come out of such conflicts. From the furnaces of war, often there are produced items of inestimable value. So there is a certain "beating swords into plowshares" truth about military conflict.

We take the Internet for granted. It was originally a DARPA project, designed specifically so that it would be able to resist efforts to bring down the network. It's done pretty well in that respect, despite all the hacking attempts, hasn't it. DARPA stands for the United States Defense Advance Research Projects Agency.

Many of us now take GPS for granted, another US Defense Department project -- that's now being shared with civilian populations globally.

I could go on, but you get the picture.


right. but isn't that something mankind should be much ashamed for?

cooltouch wrote:
Glad (and sad) to see I was right about guessing that the item was a turbine component (that's all jet engines are, are turbines with a bit of fuel added to them). Here in the US, we would have long since recycled that mountain of scrap.


recycling is very big in Vietnam, but those are trophies of war, pieces of exhibition


PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Andreas, I called it "dancing light on water", shot in ultraviolet light using long exposure.


PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
Thanks Andreas, I called it "dancing light on water", shot in ultraviolet light using long exposure.


'dancing light on water'...YES!
thank you for the explanation Klaus, I was wondering how it was made


PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kuuan wrote:
right. but isn't that something mankind should be much ashamed for?

Agreed. Weaponry are not the direct cause of wars, but I think the ones facilitating and driving warfare (arms manufacturers, esp. those who make things like cluster bombs) that are enriching themselves to ridiculous degrees should be condemned without reserve.


PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2011 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nikon D 700 AFS 70 - 300 VR at 180mm f 5.6 1/320s ISO 3200 100% crop



PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


( S-M-C 1.4/50 on Pentax K-x )


PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

der einrahmer wrote:
Nikon D 700 AFS 70 - 300 VR at 180mm f 5.6 1/320s ISO 3200 100% crop


Did you catch this trout?


PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pentax 645
Pentax-A 150/3.5 lens
Provia



PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting thing Laurence!
What is it?


PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Himself wrote:
Interesting thing Laurence!
What is it?

+1...my guess is some form of buoys floating on the water but the angle is wrong?


PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mo wrote:
Himself wrote:
Interesting thing Laurence!
What is it?

+1...my guess is some form of buoys floating on the water but the angle is wrong?

I guess the same.
Very nice picture, Laurence ! Smile


PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2011 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi Mo,
sorry for the late reply - wasnt watching this thread for a while
- no i didnt catch it - it is in our city center from a small pedestrian bidge and i took some pics, when they came out of water to catch bread pieces. Unfortunately my good Nikon 80 - 200 2,8 failed because of strong CA, the new lens did it much better
in the meantime theyre gone ( around 10 trouts with 40 - 50 cm lenght ), obviously many people had a good meal


PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2011 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurence wrote:
Pentax 645
Pentax-A 150/3.5 lens
Provia


Very nice image Laurence!