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Bessa L Voigtlander 4.5/15mm Heliar Fuji Velvia 50 genuine
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 3:06 pm    Post subject: Bessa L Voigtlander 4.5/15mm Heliar Fuji Velvia 50 genuine Reply with quote

hi-res images are here

I under exposed almost any scene Embarassed

These are the best ones

Film was expired in 12.2007, stored right in fridge.
#1 Small park for kids

#2 New community park at harbor Lagymanyos Budapest

#3

#4

#5

#6


Last edited by Attila on Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:15 pm; edited 2 times in total


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A bit dark on my monitor, but very nice images, Attila. This lens clearly has balls. Another one for my wishlist!! Rolling Eyes Laughing


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, all of them dark , I guess I need to control with external light meter.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought the meter in these were supposed to be accurate. Hummm. Nice
shots, tho, even if they are a little dark.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have an another idea, perhaps need longer exposition because expired in 12.1997. What you think ?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe a bit dark...but they all have PUNCH!


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For super wide angles, you have to expose more since they contain
more sky area, which is normally brighter. Idea


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

koji wrote:
For super wide angles, you have to expose more since they contain
more sky area, which is normally brighter. Idea


Yes Koji San, this is so true. One aperture or more ?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurence wrote:
Maybe a bit dark...but they all have PUNCH!


They have lovely colors ,perhaps because a bit dark + Velvia 50 I guess. Thank you!


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
koji wrote:
For super wide angles, you have to expose more since they contain
more sky area, which is normally brighter. Idea


Yes Koji San, this is so true. One aperture or more ?


Make it easier, put your hand in the open light, then go very close to it with the lens and meter your hand. The hand's reflectivity is close to the 18% grey of in-camera's lightmeter.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Should I put my hand into light path ? Try to cover sky ?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
Should I put my hand into light path ? Try to cover sky ?


No, you should meter your hand, like if your hand was the subject of your photo.
Once you have measured light this way, you can keep the value for all photos - until the light changes, of course.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah okay thank you!!


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A little dark but nice shots Attila. I know everybody already said it.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Schnauzer wrote:
A little dark but nice shots Attila. I know everybody already said it.


Thank you ! Velvia slide did magic. I suppose I made double mistake I not counted sky parts well and this film need I suppose one stop more exposition. I will use as an ISO 25 film Shocked because it was a bit dark too when sky is not dominated.

What you think ?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:

Thank you ! Velvia slide did magic. I suppose I made double mistake I not counted sky parts well and this film need I suppose one stop more exposition. I will use as an ISO 25 film Shocked because it was a bit dark too when sky is not dominated.
What you think ?


Be careful, because with slides, especially slow slides like 50 ISO, a variation of 1/3rd stop is already important. To treat it like a 25 ISO (a 3/3rds shift) regardless of conditions would mean a high risk of having to trash a lot of pictures.
What you say could work with B&W film but I would never recommend that method with slides. Slides require custom light metering for each shot more than negative film, and much more than B&W negative film.
If you are unsure of how much sky to consider for each photo, use the hand method. It works in 90% of the cases, the exceptions being the notable and well known limits of the 18% grey metering, that is, for instance, snowy landscapes. Alternatively, you need to spot, in your scene, an area that could work well compared to 18% grey, and spot-meter that.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about if I measure with digital cam ? When I get good result with digi cam I use same settings on film ?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
How about if I measure with digital cam ? When I get good result with digi cam I use same settings on film ?


That can be useful for you, to have a preview of the result before shooting the film.
If you want to get better at metering, however, I suggest you this path:

1) choose a scene (best if there is variety, such as both sunlight and shadows, pale objects and dark objects)

2) open the Gossen meter and try metering the scene in various modes: reflected light, incident light, spot light on selected objects (if available), and also grey card (or hand). Take note of the values.

3) Take DSLR and put it in Manual mode, and try to shoot with the different values you noted before. Compare the previews and see the differences.

4) pick your preferred setting and use it on the film camera.

This way you will not just make the good picture, but also learn how to do it without preview next time.

The above method is part of how I would teach photography to a child of mine if I had one.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for detailed instructions!


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While the above methods are good and fine my personal taste really dislikes washed out or white skies.

IMHO, they kill a photo a lot more that some underexposition than you can always recover a bit in post production.

I'm not meaning you can cover errors in post production, it's a coscient choice. You go for the sky, to have well defined clouds, etc, and then try to balance a bit things after.

This if you don't have a neutral gradual filter of course, otherway it'd take care to underexpose the sky, but it would add some rigidity.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Allessandro sky is very important me too. I found very easy to modify scanned print film and harder to modify scanned slide in PS. I am a bit worried about slides perhaps I will shoot on film too.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila, you love detail in photos, and with negative film, you lose a lot of detail compared to slides.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Attila, you love detail in photos, and with negative film, you lose a lot of detail compared to slides.


I completely agree. I tried Reala and while its colours (especially in a nature setting) were wonderful the resolution is miles away from a Velvia.