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Apo Lanthar test Reports
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

james wrote:
The "Voigtlnder" name is still owned by Zeiss (only licensed to Cosina and predating the ZF/ZE/ZK/ZM contracts) so I imagine they do have a say how Cosina uses it.


Sorry if I seem pedantic, but the Voigtlnder brand has nothing to do with Zeiss since the 1980s.

The Voigtlnder company was founded in Vienna (Austria) by Johann Friedrich Voigtlnder in 1756. In 1925, the family business was transformed into a stock corporation and in 1930, Schering AG, a German pharmaceutical company, acquired the majority of the Voigtlnder shares. In 1959, Schering AG sold Voigtlnder to the Carl-Zeiss-Foundation, which first chose to keep the Voigtlnder brand, then decided to merge Zeiss-Ikon and Voigtlnder into one entity. But soon the new Zeiss-Ikon-Voitlnder company went into trouble, due to the increasing concurrence of the Japanese industry. In 1982, the Voigtlnder brand was sold to Rollei, then sold again in 1996 to Plusfoto GmbH, and finally sold to Ringfoto GmbH & Alfo Marketing KG in 1997.

Ringfoto still owns the Voigtlnder brand today and sells cheap digital cameras and accessories under the name Voigtlnder (see this page), but it has also licensed the name to Cosina to commercialize a line of higher grade rangefinder cameras and lenses.

Cheers!

Abbazz


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Appreciate the correction.

But I still stand by the dealer who similarly alluded to a 'new lens' before the announcement of the CV 20.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

james wrote:
I still stand by the dealer who similarly alluded to a 'new lens' before the announcement of the CV 20.

Of course Cosina might very well release a new SLII lens but I doubt it will be a new version of the Macro Apo-Lanthar 125/2.5 because, as explained before, the new lens would compete with the Zeiss Makro-Planar 100/2. But the new lens could very well be an enhanced version of the Apo-Lanthar 180/4. My personal favorite would be a retrofocus version of Cosina's Ultra-Wide Heliar -- which is still today the widest rectilinear lens covering the 24x36 format, tied for the first place with the 12-24mm Sigma zoom...

Cheers!

Abbazz


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Sebastien for the correction, you were a bit faster than me to respond!

Personally I would second the opinion of a forthcoming super wide in SL II version, due to the demand for such lens in a "small sensor world".


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that would be something; a 12 or 15mm rectilinear! The SLI versions required mirror lock-up, though.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Abbazz wrote:

Of course Cosina might very well release a new SLII lens but I doubt it will be a new version of the Macro Apo-Lanthar 125/2.5 because, as explained before, the new lens would compete with the Zeiss Makro-Planar 100/2.


A good argument, although using it one could also argue that Cosina would not release a 20mm lens because it would compete with the Zeiss 21mm or 18mm. Except, they did. Of course, its a lot less expensive.

Cosina, if you are reading this, please feel free to use the same strategy to make an SL2 Makro 125/2.5 that sells for less than half what the Zeiss 100/2 Makro costs.

Abbazz wrote:
But the new lens could very well be an enhanced version of the Apo-Lanthar 180/4.


Well, that would be very nice, certainly.

Abbazz wrote:
My personal favorite would be a retrofocus version of Cosina's Ultra-Wide Heliar -- which is still today the widest rectilinear lens covering the 24x36 format, tied for the first place with the 12-24mm Sigma zoom...


Isn't the whole point of the ultra-Wide Heliar and the Super-Wide Heliar that they are [b]non-retrofocus[/url] designs? So a retrofocus version is simply a new lens.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

james wrote:
Now that would be something; a 12 or 15mm rectilinear! The SLI versions required mirror lock-up, though.


That was why Sebastien specified a retrofocus design.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ChrisLilley wrote:
Isn't the whole point of the ultra-Wide Heliar and the Super-Wide Heliar that they are [b]non-retrofocus[/url] designs? So a retrofocus version is simply a new lens.

In fact, the very short focal length of the Ultra-Wide Heliar required the rear nodal point to be moved backwards a bit comparatively to a symmetrical design (compare the layout to a Biogon or a Super-Angulon for example). So, strictly speaking, the 12/5.6 lens -- as its 15/4.5 sibling -- is not a pure non-retrofocus design but indeed a "mild" retrofocus design with a stronger divergent front group:



The focal length of a lens is the distance between the image plane and the rear nodal point. It means that for a non-retrofocus 12mm lens, the distance between the rear nodal point (which is located inside the lens in a symmetrical design) and the focal plane would not be enough to clear the shutter of a Leica!

Cheers!

Abbazz