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Alpine Lake Reflection
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 10:28 pm    Post subject: Alpine Lake Reflection Reply with quote

I am very lucky to have this alpine lake about 4 hours from my house, counting the 1.5 hour drive and the 2:5 hour hike.

I almost never see anyone here. Smile

This was in October last year, when the meadows were turning golden, and the plants were in their Fall colorations of reds, and golds, and greens.

See the little peninsula showing at the top of the image? That is my camping spot! Cool

Unnamed Alpine Lake


Pentax 645
Vega 12B 90/2.8
f:16, 1/60th
Fuji Provia



PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Magical. I must get some of that Provia, then perhaps a ticket to somewhere like that Smile

What do you reckon is the better for landscapes, Provia or Velvia? It looks like I'll be trying Fuji film out first, since it's coming in as the cheapest to start with and I'm decades out of touch with slide emulsions.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This nice shot reminds me the impressionist painter's compositions.
Worderful colours!.
Congratulations, Larry.

Jes.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Jesito - it has that quality of light that the impressionists wer often crazy about - especially Monet and Renoir.


patrickh


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What impresses me is that thanks to the particular crop, the reflection seems more real than the real thing. I can not recall another photograph where I saw this happening.

Again, another masterwork.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Farside wrote:
Magical. I must get some of that Provia, then perhaps a ticket to somewhere like that Smile

What do you reckon is the better for landscapes, Provia or Velvia? It looks like I'll be trying Fuji film out first, since it's coming in as the cheapest to start with and I'm decades out of touch with slide emulsions.


Of course, it depends on what you want to bring out in a landscape, Farside. If it's a dull day, and you want the colors to come out, then Velvia. But for most applications, I lean toward Provia.

Provia scans a lot better than Velvia, and it's so easy for Velvia to become "gaudy". That said, Velvia is a fantastic film.

Don't use Velvia for people shots, of course. In fact, for those shots, try to switch to a print film emulsion such as NP160 or equivalent.

Fuji Provia is actually a tiny bit over-saturated itself, because I had to go in and de-saturate the colors in this image by about 5%, or they would have been a little "over" what I saw that day.

There are also some wonderful Kodak emulsions as well. One nice thing, is that we have good choices, and film has just about been optimized as far as it can go with current technology, so we reap the benefit.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:
This nice shot reminds me the impressionist painter's compositions.
Worderful colours!.
Congratulations, Larry.

Jes.


Exactly! That was my err....impression, as well, when I wandering the lakeshore that evening. Thank you for commenting!


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

patrickh wrote:
I agree with Jesito - it has that quality of light that the impressionists wer often crazy about - especially Monet and Renoir.

patrickh


Yes, Patrick. With that kind of light, how can you go wrong? It was bouncing off the cliffy hillside that you can see in the reflection, and creating a smooth light.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
What impresses me is that thanks to the particular crop, the reflection seems more real than the real thing. I can not recall another photograph where I saw this happening.

Again, another masterwork.


Thank you Orio. I totally agree, and remember looking at the reflections as I walked, and the lake being so calm that it sharpened the reflections.

I am seeing more of this area in my transparencies that I am reviewing right now, so I'll probably post a couple more this evening.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 6:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Damn, you are a artist and a painter Shocked
You surprise us everyday with a different style
Tanks for sharing those marvel with us


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm very impressed, Laurence, it's one of those scenes you just have to capture. Putting myself there in my imagination though, I think I'd have been tempted to use a wider lens - to me this feels a bit too cropped and also a bit too busy. It took a few seconds for me to see that the mountain was a reflection and that the water line was right up close to the top of the picture. Just a personal taste.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave, after my disappointment with Velvia in Paris and Holland, I certainly wouldn't recommend it for landscapes, not for my eyes anyway. Maybe it would be worth you trying a roll to experiment with, but be prepared for the pictures to be way over-saturated. So far I haven't found any way of correcting my failures with PS. Sad


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

poilu wrote:
Damn, you are a artist and a painter Shocked
You surprise us everyday with a different style
Tanks for sharing those marvel with us


And you, poilu, are extremely good with the English language. And, I thank you very much. I always look forward to hearing from you.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peterqd wrote:
I'm very impressed, Laurence, it's one of those scenes you just have to capture. Putting myself there in my imagination though, I think I'd have been tempted to use a wider lens - to me this feels a bit too cropped and also a bit too busy. It took a few seconds for me to see that the mountain was a reflection and that the water line was right up close to the top of the picture. Just a personal taste.


I completely agree with you peter! Unfortunately I was backed up against a 50 foot tall cliff. And also unfortunately -- I didn't have a wider lens with me. Now that I have the Flektogon 25/4, I will be going back to the lake when the snow melts...which will probably be about August. Thank you VERY much, I appreciate suggestions of all kinds. That is how I can grow as a photographer.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peterqd wrote:
Dave, after my disappointment with Velvia in Paris and Holland, I certainly wouldn't recommend it for landscapes, not for my eyes anyway. Maybe it would be worth you trying a roll to experiment with, but be prepared for the pictures to be way over-saturated. So far I haven't found any way of correcting my failures with PS. Sad


I've used Velvia for some landscape shots, but Provia is my first choice, peter and Dave. In actuality, it has more density than Velvia, along with a clear resolution compared to Velvia.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Larry this is so beautiful. Having been up to some of the lakes in the Olympics. I can say from experience, you have captured the magic of the area perfectly. You really are a true journeyman in your niche. The volume and quality of images you present to the group is just very inspiring. I want to give you a very heartfelt thank you for your continued contributions. Very Happy


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reflecting on this picture I get the impression that it is quite
colorful indeed! Thanks for sharing this, Larry!

Andy, Larry is not an apprentice, a journeyman, but a master of this
niche! Wink

I've been to several mountain lakes in the Cascades, the Selkirks, but
I have to say none compare to what I see in this picture, marvelous!

Bill


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Andy, Larry is not an apprentice, a journeyman, but a master of this
niche!



Well spoken Bill

Larry you are truly a master Cool


PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Geeze....thank you very much! Embarassed

But TRULY...the areas are really so fine with scenery that all you REALLY have to do is just point the camera at the stuff and shoot away.

I'm stunned a flattered -- I've not had this kind of enthusiasm for my images before, but then again I guess I haven't really shown too many of my images. So...thanks again, and you all are giving me inspiration to keep going.

Smile


PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 12:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the pointer, Laurence and Peter. I'll try Provia first and see how I get on with it. I recall I usually underexposed Ektachrome by half a stop to saturate it a little bit - I wonder if the reverse would work with Velvia by overexposing it a touch.


PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 1:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Careful with overexposing slides - once whites are gone, they are really gone.


PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Careful with overexposing slides - once whites are gone, they are really gone.


Yes, that's true. Of course, it all depends on what I get to practice with - I see some real bargains on out of date films on ebay just now. Until I'm sure of the light-tightness of the camera there's no point in spending much on film just to run through it initially.
As far as Velvia goes, I wonder if it's slightly biased for green - the greens are so punchy they leap out and sock you on the jaw.