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127 Film
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 10:17 pm    Post subject: 127 Film Reply with quote

http://www.frugalphotographer.com/cat127.htm

http://www.bluefire.ca/BluefireMurano.htm

Available here.


PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As of today, the 127 film IS AVAILABLE! I just bought three rolls, and I don't even have a 127 camera yet. It's just that hard to come by.

Edit to respond to Nesster without making a new post:
The Yashica 44 is the TLR I want the 127 for. There's a mint green body at a local consignment store, but it's $125 and that seems about $30-40 steep to me.


Last edited by David on Fri Dec 21, 2012 7:35 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2012 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?atclk=Format_127&ci=2545&N=4294548524+4130468171

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/100127-Fotokemika-Efke-R100-iso-100-127-size?cat_id=403
Freestyle also has the Rollei film

David, Laughing~ a couple of years ago I bought 3 rolls of the Efke, turns out my Kodak Starflex shutter did not work. So I had to buy a Yashica 44 because I had the film.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2012 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can get it also from Spain:

http://www.foto-r3.com/pelicula-byn/127

Jes.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2012 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:
You can get it also from Spain:

http://www.foto-r3.com/pelicula-byn/127

Jes.


and a superb film

http://forum.mflenses.com/konica-baby-pearl-rollei-retro-80s-127-rollfilm-t41188,highlight,%2Bkonica+%2Bbaby.html


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:32 pm    Post subject: 127 Reply with quote

I have in the cupboard, an old Kodak snap camera, a boxed Kodak Brownie Reflex without instruction booklet(shame!) it's in very good order and functions correctly. A traditional snap camera for family outings and picnics. This camera is from my wife's (June) father (now deceased) who bought it new a little after the war. It hasn't been used since the sixties, but since 127 film is now available again, we might give it a go on some b/w and get some retro snapshots out of a completely authentic snapshot camera. I do believe that if you stay within the confines of their performance, some pretty good results are achievable.

shutter, one speed plus bulb. singleblade with return mask, uncoupled to transport.

lens fixed aperture between f5.6 to f8, fixed focus 8ft to inf, single element glass meniscus, uncoated.

film 127 roll, 4X4 cm

transport, Bakelite winding knob and red window indexed to numbers on film backing.

metering, right, okay?

chassis, Bakelite black moulding and panels of aluminium pressings

viewfinder, reflex viewing screen camera is a TLR.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:32 pm    Post subject: Re: 127 Reply with quote

MTHall wrote:
I have in the cupboard, an old Kodak snap camera, a boxed Kodak Brownie Reflex without instruction booklet(shame!) it's in very good order and functions correctly. A traditional snap camera for family outings and picnics. This camera is from my wife's (June) father (now deceased) who bought it new a little after the war. It hasn't been used since the sixties, but since 127 film is now available again, we might give it a go on some b/w and get some retro snapshots out of a completely authentic snapshot camera. I do believe that if you stay within the confines of their performance, some pretty good results are achievable.

shutter, one speed plus bulb. singleblade with return mask, uncoupled to transport.

lens fixed aperture between f5.6 to f8, fixed focus 8ft to inf, single element glass meniscus, uncoated.

film 127 roll, 4X4 cm

transport, Bakelite winding knob and red window indexed to numbers on film backing.

metering, right, okay?

chassis, Bakelite black moulding and panels of aluminium pressings

viewfinder, reflex viewing screen camera is a TLR.


I've got a ton of old family photographs here, I scanned our immediate family albums and gave everyone in the family a CD, then they loaned me their immediate family albums and so it went on. I have now done most of my wife's family as well.
And all through doing this I am constantly astonished at the quality of these original prints, I have very few negatives.
Most of the pictures are 'special' in that they are taken on special occasions and generally by someone who had a knowledge of photography at that time, they were taken on a sunny day. But blow some of these old prints up and the detail is something I would be proud of with a modern camera.
Get some film in the old Kodak, surprise yourself.